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61

Breadth of Option Unexpected monster rears out of the darkness, clearly well beyond the battered party's ability to handle? Wizard teleports home. Fighter manages to kill the thing half to death before he gets eaten. Ambuscade! The earl's men have the party cornered, and demand they surrender - only execution awaits if they do. Wizard casts ...


41

Strictly speaking, it’s not actually true The terms “linear” and “quadratic” come from mathematics. Linear growth is one in which the rate of change is constant. Notably, this means that no one level can be particularly special, each level would involve the same bonuses as the one before it, and growth only happens because of the accumulation. For ...


37

Change how you play your wizard so those are the right spells With the spells you've listed you can play an effective wizard but it will likely require changing up your play style. Let's look at some tactics that suit your spells. Blast 'em This isn't going to be your strong suit but there are plenty of opportunities to contribute with some straight up ...


28

Three reasons, in order of increasing importance: flexibility, narrative agency, and expectations. Flexibility: A well-built fighter can compete with a wizard in pretty much any combat-specific area. Wizards can be very good at grappling, so can fighters. Wizards can deal very large amounts of damage, so can fighters. Wizards can be good at ranged ...


25

By raw, they are free The rules for leveling up a wizard state that you can add two wizard spells of your choice to your spellbook for free. The rules for gaining a level (PHB p.15) state that a character who reaches a specified experience point total advances in capability. There is no mention of a delay on either point. But your DM is free to change this ...


25

No. The Monk feature says that you can use the bonus action Unarmed strike after you use the Attack action with a Monk weapon or Unarmed strike. Shocking Grasp requires the Cast a Spell action, which does not qualify.


24

Not exactly. The rules on Working Together in order to give advantage are as follows: A character can only provide help if the task is one that he or she could attempt alone. For example, trying to open a lock requires proficiency with thieves’ tools, so a character who lacks that proficiency can’t help another character in that task. Moreover, a ...


23

Things you can do, by the book: Everything you listed except scribe a new spell. Source: PHB pg. 114 That actually requires you to write down the spell, and has a material cost associated with it that is usually associated with special inks and gems. Yes, you can recall it from memory and write it into your book, upon which you would have it memorized for ...


22

No. The section on Preparing and Casting Spells for the wizard states: you can change your list of prepared spells when you finish a long rest. If it said something like "anytime after you finish a long rest" then sure. But as it's worded you can only change your list of prepared spells when you finish a long rest. Failure to do so leaves you with the ...


22

Mike Mearls stated on Twitter: for sorcerer, we avoid more complex spells. Sorcerer magic is simpler, more direct See: http://www.sageadvice.eu/2015/08/22/sorcerer-vs-wizard-spell-list/ The spells you mentioned are more "utility" spells - they have an effect that is not immediate or that can be used in ways that might not seem apparent. Sorcerers ...


21

That is correct. As you quoted, each wizard's spellbook notation is unique, therefore you can't prepare spells from someone else's book. You must first copy the spell into your own book (deciphering the notation in the process), after which you can prepare it as normal.


19

Is this pretty typical, or have I missed something? Yes, just as in many good games (tabletop or otherwise), you are given a finite resource which you must learn to economize. It's all part of the game! At low levels, it's pretty easy to run out of spell slots, you only have 2 of them so it is up to you to manage them and make the most out of what you ...


18

Tributes and Legacies for Characters in Olde Greyhawk I find it hard to understand how a convention like this could come about, Background on Named Spells Named spells were first published in books in 1e AD&D. The original spell list published in Men and Magic (1974, OD&D, TSR, p. 21) had no named spells. All spells titles were ...


18

Cantrips are your main damage If you run out of spell slots, you use Cantrips. It's possible to use actual weaponry, but not advised. They deal lower damage and you have only a d6 of health. If you aren't satisfied with ray of frost, try getting some other Cantrips when you increase in level. Longbow would be alright if you had the dexterity, but your ...


18

Leomund's Tiny Hut Range: Self (10-foot-radius hemisphere) Hemisphere: One 1/2 of a Sphere, a partial sphere. IE: Dome. ...A 10 foot radius immobile dome of force springs into existence around and above you and remains stationary... Unfortunately the intent of the spell is in it's very first line. It creates a half spherical dome that ...


18

Talk to your DM. It's your first time playing. Ask the DM if you can change some of your spell choices now that you have a better understanding of how the spells work. Suggest that they could give all of the other players the chance to make similar changes to their characters. This isn't at all uncommon among groups with new players (or new DMs).


15

No, Knowing a spell is not enough to transcribe or copy it All the methods given for putting spells into a Wizard's spellbook require that Wizard has seen the spell in written form. Their options are transcribing a spell that they have prepared (by reading it from their spellbook), or copying spells they have found in other written sources such as scrolls, ...


15

D&D creatures may have evasion abilities such as flying, invisibility, damage reduction, darkness, illusions, ensnarement, walls, and teleportation. Spellcasters have spells which can defeat monsters that have these evasion abilities, and they have spells which can give themselves these evasion abilities. Fighters don't have any intrinsic way to deal ...


15

You have a number of options here. DM Generosity Ask the DM to let you swap out spells. That's the only possible answer to your question as you've posed it, but what you have here is what we call an XY Problem on Stack Exchange - you aren't asking about your real problem, you're asking about one solution you've seized on. Read on to find out the real ...


15

TL;DR: Keen Memory can't replace the magic on the spellbook. Disclaimer: This answer is based on the premise that there is something inherently magical about the spellbook or the ritual of preparing spells. GM should rule about it and, if it fits with how magic is handled in your campaign, everything is possible. The spellbook is more than just a book with ...


14

This is how Wizards prepare spells (PHB p. 114): You prepare the list of wizard spells that are available for you to cast. To do so, choose a number of wizard spells from your spellbook ... You can only prepare spells that are in your spellbook. You can't crib off someone else's notes! This is how you add spells to your spellbook (PHB p. 114): ...


14

Sorry, no, you can't re-use them. A prepared spell in Vancian systems like D&D's is a one-and-done deal: it's impossible* to retain the full form of it after casting it once, and it's similarly impossible** to keep the full forms in memory in any way. The closest you can get is to avoid casting at least one copy of each spell until you can write it down ...


13

Yes, you can use Instictive Charm against spell attacks. You can use it against anything that requires an attack roll, not just against the Attack action. From the PHB at p.205: Attack Rolls Some spells require the caster to make an attack roll to determine whether the spell effect hits the intended target.... Most spells that require attack rolls ...


13

Right now it is undefined, play as it makes sense to you We encountered the same issue a few months back, and in the spirit of "rulings insetead of rules", we decided that it protects from below as well. Balance The intent of the spell is indeed to keep the enemies out, and the majority of the monsters, if not straight out posessing a burrowing speed or ...


13

The second sentence is simply the description/justification for the first sentence. The only effects are the ones described: resistance to necrotic damage and immunity to maximum hit point reduction. In case it's the source of your confusion: "inured" just means "accustomed to". So this is just saying that you've been hanging around with undead for so long ...


12

True Strike (PHB p.296, 1st-level) You gain temporary, intuitive insight into the immediate future during your next attack. Your next single attack roll (if it is made before the end of the next round) gains a +20 insight bonus. Additionally, you are not affected by the miss chance that applies to attackers trying to strike a concealed target. Emphasis ...


12

No. Grim Harvest gives you the ability to reap life energy from the enemies you kill with your spells (PHB 118). The full text is: At 2nd level, you gain the ability to reap life energy from creatures you kill with your spells. Once per turn when you kill one or more creatures with a spell of 1st level or higher, you regain hit points equal to twice the ...


12

I can add references from the DMG/PHB but my interpretation of this situation is as follows. Order of Events: Player is in combat/finished combat Player gains experience from encounter, enough to level up. According to the rules, player levels up immediately. There is no specific rule saying the player does not gain spells normally, so all new spells are ...


12

Pg. 150/153 holds the answer. PHB pg. 150 A book might contain poetry, historical accounts, information pertaining to a particular field of lore, diagrams and notes on gnomish contraptions, or just about anything else that can be represented using text or pictures. A book of spells is a spellbook (described later in this section). And... PHB ...


11

[First off: if you have an INT of 20, you have a +5 modifier, not a +4. So a 4th level wizard with an INT of 20 can prepare 9 spells, not 8. Now on to the main question.] You may be thinking in terms of 3.5e style preparation rather than 5e. In 5e, you don't have to match spells to spell slots when preparing them. A 4th level wizard with INT 20 can prepare ...



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