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36

The description of Burning Hands states that it 'sets fire to flammable objects'. At its maximum, it is a 15-foot wide cone. So the answer here is that it might be able to set fire to a wooden building, but wouldn't necessarily burn it down, unless the fire was ignored for a reasonable length of time. Remember, too, that even in medieval times there were ...


26

Depending on the context of the encounter, the following might be relevant: Surprise If surprised, you lose your turn for the first round of combat. This includes loosing use of any reaction for one round, measured from the beginning of combat until the start of your turn on round two. Which I got from this quick reference: ...


23

Yes, and this is explicitly stated on page 114 of the Player's Handbook in the "Your Spellbook" sidebar in the Wizard class description. It works exactly as you are hoping: If you lose your spellbook, you can use the [procedure in the preceeding paragraph] to transcribe the spells that you have prepared into a new spellbook. Filling out the remainder of ...


22

You've already stated the key point: 1 reaction, which you take when you are hit by an attack or targeted by the magic missile spell. So what you need to understand here is that the Shield spell involves time travel. No, really, it does. You can cast Shield when you're hit by an attack. Not when you're targeted, or when someone tries to attack you, but ...


22

Depends where you aim it. Contrary to what you might think, wooden walls (especially ones used for building things) are not super flammable. Non-treated wood has a flash point of 300 C, which is about 80 degrees hotter than what it takes to ignite paper. This means that it takes a very long, or very hot fire in order to make wood light on fire. Think of ...


20

That is correct. As you quoted, each wizard's spellbook notation is unique, therefore you can't prepare spells from someone else's book. You must first copy the spell into your own book (deciphering the notation in the process), after which you can prepare it as normal.


18

Yes, you can cast spells without your spellbook. And yes, your list of prepared spells will stay prepared until you prepare a new list. In the Preparing and Casting spells section, only preparing a new list of spells actually requires your spellbook. Casting just requires spell slots and a prepared list of spells, and regaining spell slots just requires a ...


18

No, they're not the same. The wizard's fine inks are cheaper! the material components you expended as you experiment with the spell to master it, as well as fine inks you need to record it The 50 gp the wizard spends covers piles of duplicate material components, and also some good-quality ink. Even cheap material components add up when you're using ...


18

Tributes and Legacies for Characters in Olde Greyhawk I find it hard to understand how a convention like this could come about, Background on Named Spells Named spells were first published in books in 1e AD&D. The original spell list published in Men and Magic (1974, OD&D, TSR, p. 21) had no named spells. All spells titles were ...


17

I agree that the part about recharging is a bit ambiguous, because it's part of a two-sentence paragraph: While the ward has 0 hit points, it can't absorb damage, but its magic remains. Whenever you cast an abjuration spell of 1st level or higher, the ward regains a number of hit points equal to twice the level of the spell. If these were written ...


17

I would say no to both copying and casting Wizard spells above level 1, based on the spellcasting rules under multiclassing on pg 164 of the PHB: You determine what spells you know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class I read that as saying that you would count as a level 1 wizard, which comes ...


17

From the "Your Spellbook" sidebar, page 32 of the Player's Basic Rules (v0.2): When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a level for which you have spell slots and if you can spare the time to decipher and copy it. Emphasis mine. Only spells on the Wizard list can be learned in this way. In this ...


16

There is no official answer on this specifically that I'm aware of, however it's likely a part of WotC's attempts to cut down on the Wizard's versatility. In earlier editions, especially 3.5, the Wizard had access to just about any kind of spell you could think of. This played a large part in making the "Batman Wizard" who was able to deal with just about ...


15

The Basics The rules for getting spells into wizard's spellbook are convoluted and finicky. They're summarized below so the player knows what he's getting into when he writes Wiz1 on his character sheet. Starting Spells and Free Spells A wizard's spellbook for free initially contains all 0th-level spells and additional spells he knows due to being a level ...


15

You maintain concentration, regardless of the form. Your ability to concentrate on a spell does not depend on any mental statistic. You can also continue to concentrate on a spell, even if you cannot cast spells. For example, Silence, Druid Wildshape, and the Antimagic Field spell all restrict spellcasting, but not do not restrict your ability to ...


14

They remain as they physically are after reverting, as logic and rule interpretation dictate. The feature's last sentence specifies that when it ends "the material reverts to its original substance", mentioning no physical change at all. Moreover, there is no mention of the temporarily changed material having any unusual properties (such as stone->wood ...


14

The published rules don't go into this level of detail. As far as I see it there are two basic ways to rule this. The pragmatic approach Fine inks are rare, and rare inks are fine. They cost about the same, so they are the same. The flavourful approach For example: A wizard's fine inks are the sort you could use to write an invitation to a society ball. ...


14

This is how Wizards prepare spells (PHB p. 114): You prepare the list of wizard spells that are available for you to cast. To do so, choose a number of wizard spells from your spellbook ... You can only prepare spells that are in your spellbook. You can't crib off someone else's notes! This is how you add spells to your spellbook (PHB p. 114): ...


14

No, Knowing a spell is not enough to transcribe or copy it All the methods given for putting spells into a Wizard's spellbook require that Wizard has seen the spell in written form. Their options are transcribing a spell that they have prepared (by reading it from their spellbook), or copying spells they have found in other written sources such as scrolls, ...


11

Sorry, no, you can't re-use them. A prepared spell in Vancian systems like D&D's is a one-and-done deal: it's impossible* to retain the full form of it after casting it once, and it's similarly impossible** to keep the full forms in memory in any way. The closest you can get is to avoid casting at least one copy of each spell until you can write it down ...


10

The Forlorn flaw from Dragon vol. 333 prevents you from gaining a familiar. As with all flaws, you get an extra feat for taking it. The existence of the Obtain Familiar feat (Complete Arcane) suggests that this is a fair trade and that the familiar is valued about the same as a feat. For actual alternate options, from the best list of alternate class ...


10

Not a spellbook, but... The Pact of the Tome for the Warlock gives you access to a Book of Shadows (PHB p 108). Now, a Book of Shadows is a grimoire, a.k.a. "textbook of magic", a.k.a. the Half-Blood Prince's annotated copy of Advanced Potion Making. And it contains any three cantrips you care to name. Given that this is your character's background story, ...


10

There is a spell to make him keep his word: Geas (PHB, page 244.). It would probably break copyright for me to type it all out here, so I'll mention the important bits. Geas is a 5th-level spell available to most spellcasters that forces a target to carry out a task or command given at the time of casting. A Geas lasts a limited amount of time based on ...


10

The Ritual move gives you all you ask for already! Have the player tell you what they would like to achieve: gaining the ability to breathe fire permanently or temporary, or enchanting an item to grant them the ability to breathe fire, or whatever. If the players' indications are not clear enough, ask questions and use the answers! Then, with your players ...


10

[First off: if you have an INT of 20, you have a +5 modifier, not a +4. So a 4th level wizard with an INT of 20 can prepare 9 spells, not 8. Now on to the main question.] You may be thinking in terms of 3.5e style preparation rather than 5e. In 5e, you don't have to match spells to spell slots when preparing them. A 4th level wizard with INT 20 can prepare ...


10

It doesn't say that the save is negated, so it remains. You still deal maximum damage, as it says, just as if you had rolled for it. After dealing that damage, they may save to mitigate the damage, as usual when such damage is dealt. Overchannel does only what it says: it changes how much damage the spell deals. When a spell that offers a saving throw deals ...


9

No. Cantrips are never prepared, they are only learned, and from then on they are known and available to cast. They explicitly cannot be copied into a spell book. From the spellbook inset on p114 of the PHB: When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if is of a level for which you have spell slots and if you ...


9

First, let's correct the misconception in your post: Casters are allowed any armor they want so long as they are proficient in it. Armor does not restrict casting. If your wizard wants to MC into something for armor proficiency or take feats to gain it, that is just fine, allowed and has no affect on his casting of spells. As to whether he can wear other ...


9

There is no explicit equivalence. However, the identical cost and function suggests that it's all the same sort of office supplies being used. Game mechanically, the ink is essentially just flavoring for the cost of adding spells to a book. In most cases the wizard could have just given the warlock 50 gp instead. There's no economic impact to the game in ...


9

No, in this case you need to decide whether you're going to use Overchannel when you cast the spell. The timing for using Overchannel is "when you cast", and a spell you can use it on is "a wizard spell of 5th level or lower that deals damage". This is merely meant to specify that you can only use it on spells that include damage as part of their effects ...



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