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3

As it stands, the question cannot be answered on its face: “over-the-top, completely unrealistic cheese” is undefined and critical to try to do a comparison of the mechanical advantages of each class. This answer, however, is challenging the frame of the question, since it compares the two classes regardless of what each is or isn’t allowed to do. Artificer ...


-2

This comparison focuses on offense only and is of little worth in my opinion. It doesn't take into account the utility and defensive capabilities of a fighter/wizard compared to an eldritch knight, or how they scale from the ground up. F/W have access to FAR more spells and are able to cast much MORE of them, where EK's spell list is severely limited. Also ...


22

Yes, and this is explicitly stated on page 114 of the Player's Handbook in the "Your Spellbook" sidebar in the Wizard class description. It works exactly as you are hoping: If you lose your spellbook, you can use the [procedure in the preceeding paragraph] to transcribe the spells that you have prepared into a new spellbook. Filling out the remainder of ...


0

IIRC, the DMG has a rule for copying spells into a spell book. They cost money and time to do each spell (assuming that you have to research them or are copying them from a scroll). Lower level spells aren't too expensive but the higher level ones can get pretty crazy. Ask your DM if this an option. Perhaps, you (and your party) can go on a quest to ...


1

If all you want to do is require wizards to use some alchemical fluff to prepare spells, then you don't have to do anything. Adding fluff like "training time" or "spell component costs" has a long history in Pathfinder's lineage, and so long as you don't make it exceptionally hard to obtain the alchemy, or otherwise make working magic unreasonably ...


0

You might want to take a look at the psionics rules, as they pretty much work that way (although i'm not sure an "ether" analog exists). As for actually changing the rest of the spellcasting classes it could get weird if it lets the wizard cast spells without preparation as it would break the sorcerer's main advantage. For that, the answer provided by ...


8

There is a supplement, Houserule Handbooks: Spell Points, that introduces a point-based system for spellcasters. It's received favorable reviews and the PDF is only $5 on Paizo's site.


2

At this point, there is no way by RAW in the Basic Rules (or in the Player's Handbook) of increasing your number of spell slots you have as a Wizard. That said, there are a few ways of effectively increasing your number of spell slots - either by restoring spell slots or providing other ways to cast your known/prepared spells - in the Dungeon Master's Guide ...


6

You maintain concentration, regardless of the form. Your ability to concentrate on a spell does not depend on any mental statistic. You can also continue to concentrate on a spell, even if you cannot cast spells. For example, Silence, Druid Wildshape, and the Antimagic Field spell all restrict spellcasting, but not do not restrict your ability to ...


2

I would think that the best way to get him to do this is to simply ask him. You would have to roll against Persuasion to convince him, but he's Neutral Evil, so you'll have to convince him that it's in his best interest to do this. In convincing him of this, he may require that you go on a quest to bring back a particular item or you could find out his ...


10

There is a spell to make him keep his word: Geas (PHB, page 244.). It would probably break copyright for me to type it all out here, so I'll mention the important bits. Geas is a 5th-level spell available to most spellcasters that forces a target to carry out a task or command given at the time of casting. A Geas lasts a limited amount of time based on ...



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