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4

Unless you are making a strong good-faith attempt to emulate a particular setting (such as playing faithfully in a published RPG like the Forgotten Realms, or trying to emulate a particular series of books or movies you enjoy) then these decisions are largely up to you. In general, look on this as an opportunity to tell an interesting story, though, rather ...


9

There are many opinion-based answers possible for this question. For example, in your setting, kobolds and gnolls could have an ancient treaty of cooperation, or ogres could make a habit of capturing and keeping kobold slaves. But there are also mechanical approaches you could use. Listed associations The Monster Manual has an Organization line in monster ...


21

You have gnolls working with goblins, kobolds, and ogres. Does the party perhaps have a human, elf, dwarf, and gnome? Because that’s exactly the same level of variety. I’m serious, it can help to think of things in those terms: the “bad guys” can be just as cooperative as the “good guys.” There’s nothing wrong with this at all. Best is if there is a good ...


21

Yes, the name/class/level relationship was originally an in-game term depicting a level of power and social status. Some in-game effects of this were the limitations on level advancement for AD&D(1e) Monks and Druids (details below), or prohibitions against Assassins (Blackmoor) having followers. Originally, the Name Level threshold opened up new ...


10

The closest would be OD&D and AD&D 1st edition and level titles. Particularly at 9th to 12th level at what was called "Name level" where the game gave explicit support for making the character a leader of his profession. The various level titles are evocative of various positions in the profession that the class represent, and are generally arranged ...


4

Potions In D&D 5e the rules for potions (located in the DMG) most closely mirror the desired effects you want. Any class can use them, but it is generally either a time-limited effect or it has some drawback (causes addiction or another of the madness conditions, requires a Con save, or causes a negative physical transformation). Also there is a list of ...


6

I'm not sure if you'll be able to gracefully staple the 2 systems together -- they're both quite different, with CoC placing more emphasis on weaker characters than D&D's heroes. I also think that Dan B's answer is spot on, in some ways. Including a sanity system can easily cause some players to screw around with it. My personal experience in ...


11

My background: I've run some adventures using insanity themes. I once had a character who used insanity-magic and was about to go insane, when his player decided the campaign was too dark for him and stopped showing up at my table. I once had a character who used insanity-magic and went insane on purpose because he wanted to kill the party and destroy the ...


-4

If I were to implement a system such as you proposed, I would limit the spell's available to the warlock class, for 2 reasons. 1) the warlock and their spell's are already flavored appropriately for the setting you are borrowing from. 2) the mechanics of how the warlock gets her spell's are similar in many ways being granted by eldritch beings. For the ...


6

Generally speaking, in D&D, even the gods have limits How many evil magic-users are there? Do they need to sleep? Are they immune to the steel-in-the-guts syndrome? Some races (elves) may be immune to charm effects. What are the good adventurers doing in the meantime? Some gods and their clergy may object, and they will have very good wisdom ...


14

There are some downsides to Illusion and Enchantment that can easily make it practitioners unable to "take over societies" Save throws For such magic to succeed you need your targets to fail a saving throw. Only one success is needed in order to "get you". Knowledge of what happened Specially for Enchantment (for most of the spells) the target knows that ...


3

My suggestions? Include your Players: Most players, be them roleplaying experts, writers, or brand new to the genre; will put some kind of effort into crafting the back story of their character in question. How deep that story is largely differs by player but each one might grant you the pleasure of enriching your world. Tie them in to your story or ...


4

Definitions and References What you are struggling with is the concept of "narrative control." In the beginning of RPGs, coming from wargames, there was an assumption that the GM had complete autocratic control over everything but the characters, and the players had domain only over their characters' reactions and thoughts and (attempted) actions. However, ...


1

Technically, but Why Bother? There are actually many games that rely on players providing details without the GM prompting them to do so. Powered by the Apocalypse (specifically, Dungeon World) comes to mind as the most relevant example, but lots of other games certainly benefit from it. However, there is a difference between adding details to a scene and ...


5

When players help to narrate the world in this manner, many DMs see it as a sign of engagement -- it means the players are having fun and the game is going well. Players are happy when they are able to do things and sad when they can't, so it's good when players can narrate minor details to let them do things better. Here's a concrete example. The party ...


8

It's up to you but... Allowing players to build the world makes the game easier By letting the players assume there was a tree immediately accessible, they were allowed to make the encounter easier. This probably isn't that big of a deal, but if they become accustomed to it, they will get better at finding what they need at just the right time. Ask ...


8

It is often a process of give and take The classic roles of GM and player are, as noted in this answer, to describe the world and to act in the world. This is what the rules-as-written support in the D&D genre. I often see two broad classes of failure mode: 1. Improper assumptions Simply put, it is not possible to completely and in detail describe ...


15

The assumption of D&D are that the DM describes the world, and the Players describe their character's actions in it. A side effect of this is that it leads to "DM may I"; in order to generate interesting actions (say, grabbing a banner, using it to swing to the other side of the staircase, knocking the gnolls down), instead of saying what your character ...


3

It's best to give your player's freedom What you've described sounds great. You should be really pleased that the players are applying this kind of free reasoning to the game. It shows your players are engaged with the game and willing to think freely about engaging with the game world. The key is to let them contribute reasonable features of the game world ...


28

TL&DR: So I'm asking, is this appropriate to disallow this? TL&DR: Yes, it is appropriate to disallow them creating things ex nihilo in the game world. You are the DM, you run the world. D&D is a cooperative story telling effort; the DM and the players have different roles. Ultimately, the Dungeon Master is the authority on the ...


46

It's ok if it's ok with you. But from your question I'd say you are not 100% cool with it. D&D, like many RPGs, boils down to a conversation between the DM/GM/Narrator and the player(s). The DM describes the scenario. The player describes what his character does. (Possibly dice are rolled) The DM describs the results, how the scenario is changed. This ...


20

From the very beginning of the DMG: The DM creates a world for the other players to explore,[...] As a storyteller, the DM helps the other players visualize what's happening around them... One of the roles of the DM is to describe what PCs see (or, more generally, perceive). This is an important aspect of your role and it has to be clarified from the ...


1

First of all, talk to your players. Flawed (because you’re not really looking for cursed, which should be a burden to all characters, while flaws could affect the user only) items are a lot of fun, but in my experience that depend on individual preferences of the players. For example, consider these categories (they could overlap, so just talk to the ...



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