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Flavor Start by thinking about what the "flavor" or general theme of the city is going to be like. Is it high or low fantasy? Bustling, decaying, wealthy, devastated, etc. Is it modeled after a real world culture or imagery - "Mayan cliff dwellers, but over 1,000 years of carving with magical assistance" etc. This is mostly mental, you don't need to ...


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It all depends on what kind of information you expect about the city, but if you are looking for a quick and easy way, myth-weavers.com offers a very well made city generator, especially for 3.5. WotC also published a pdf that basically offered the same, but with dice roll tables instead of random automatic generation. It deals a lot with the power structure ...


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A major principle of Agile is iterative development. In this case, your stakeholders are the players; they're whom you're building for. You have built-in timeboxing based on your game schedule; you know you need to deliver the next chunk of the world by the next game. Create enough of the world to run a single session. Everything else should be vaguely ...


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When writing, it might help to go breadth-first rather than depth-first. That way, you get an overview of what it is you're going to create. Say your first pass results in a few sentences about the premise for the campaign, some bullet points for each relevant location and three lines for each of the five most important NPCs. While jotting this down, your ...


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Agile only works if you have a goal (at least, a way to clearly assess your project). Even if it's off the rails, try writing down some central ideas of your world. Come back to your initial inspiration now and then and see if the current output matches your vision. Use conceptual graphs and maps to help check consistency. Start writing and don't worry -- ...



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