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28

Well, to a degree "more than surviving combat" is what you put into it... But here's some good ones I own and have read or used. All Flesh Must Be Eaten uses the Unisystem like most of Eden Studio's games; it has a large number of supplements for everything from kung fu zombies to wild west zombies. It's a toolkit game where you can make the zombies work ...


18

If the zombie is still 'alive', then Resurrection does nothing. From the spell description: You can resurrect someone killed by a death effect or someone who has been turned into an undead creature and then destroyed. You cannot resurrect someone who has died of old age. Constructs, elementals, outsiders, and undead creatures can’t be resurrected. ...


17

The problem is that zombies are pretty strongly typecast into survival horror, so you have to do something which breaks the mold. Something should happen which doesn't fit the typical zombie game... something unusual and mysterious, which prompts investigation. The most basic idea is a cure. For example, make one character turn out to be immune, and have ...


16

The Rules Are Contradictory The 7th-level Clr spell resurrection [conj] (PH 272-3) and the 9th-level Clr spell true resurrection [conj] (PH 296) say that You can [bring back from the dead] someone killed by a death effect or someone who has been turned into an undead creature and then destroyed. (emphasis mine), but the spells inherit the entry ...


15

I agree that you need to show the players (i) that they will all die if they don't investigate, and (ii) if they do investigate, they may live. Here are some ideas. (i) Give a rather insane person a MacGuffin that makes the zombies avoid them like, well, a plague. This shows that there is something useful to discover. Since this person can wander around at ...


11

Treat Them Like Swarms The first thing I thought when I read your question was - "It's not an army - it's a swarm!" Several game systems have mechanics for dealing with swarms - adversaries comprised of many smaller entities. I would look at gurps first. I remember swarm rules in GURPS as early as the late '80s, so I'm sure they're there. It's been a ...


10

If you're doing the "reveal" of the zombies in a typical survival-horror way—zombies jump out and start trying to eat the PCs—then the players are going to follow that trope. If you can break the expectations of the survival-horror genre then you'll have a chance to supply story developments to communicate that this is an investigation game. This is ...


9

The answer starts from the thinking man's response to zombies presented by John Ringo here. Zombies, fundamentally are dumb. (or if they're not, we lose.) Attracted by noise, etc. The first trick is to ensure that the characters don't know it's a zombie game. Instead, they're, for example, police, investigating an IED in a cemetery with a remarkable ...


9

You need to talk to your players about this directly, out of character. It sounds like they are playing one style of game (kill everything in sight), and you want to be running something different (a little more nuance and cooperation). You and your players need to get onto the same page about your expectations for the game. "Punishing" players is usually ...


6

It could be that the players think "this is part of the survival mechanism" because actually it is. If a player whose character dies can instantly pick another survivor to play, then the consequences for the party of killing a PC are significantly less than the consequences of trusting a possible zombie: you need to reverse this, since players respond to ...


6

There's a bunch on SoundBible: http://soundbible.com/tags-zombie.html AudioBlocks also has some nice ones, and the site shows you a graph of each clip: http://www.audioblocks.com/search/?srch-term=zombie&srch-type=sfx I'd also recommend checking out the "horror sounds", which includes various ambient sound effects popular in horror films, and a few ...


5

All Flesh Must Be Eaten is the huge zombie apocalypse RPG, and it uses Eden Studios' Unisystem which is d10 based. Any given roll only uses one or two, but since there are often hordes of zombies your d10s all get their exercise. It is a BIG game line that has something for every subgenre (Kung fu zombies! Wild West zombies! Pirate zombies! Military ...


5

I recently came to the end of running a (published) zombie apocalypse game that lasted for two real time years. Over the course of the campaign there were no PC deaths caused by other PCs, and at no point did any PC's split off from the party for more than a session. Despite this there was masses of inter-party conflict, although this was never the focus of ...


4

Extend the threat. Part of the reason that zombie-outbreak results in immediate hiding and barricading on the nearest, self-sufficient island probably lies in the sheer ruthlessness of the mechanics of expansion and infection. Make it very clear from the get-go that the infection rate from this infection is not going to immediately take over the continent: ...


4

Alright, this is in a bit of a different vein then most of the answers given: GURPS. The Complete Zombie Survival Guide focused very much on a real-world examination of how different weapons and survival conditions would work in a fictional war against the undead. World War Z mostly continued this, with some rather unfortunate misunderstandings of how much ...


4

I'd suggest using a success-based system (many dice, one target number per die). Each success with an offensive skill would have an abating effect on the horde, for example pushing it back or letting you move some distance through it. The horde would attack as a normal character with more than one position and several attacks. To simulate zombie density ...


4

I'd suggest to introduce something that gives the idea of "time running out" or, in general, of their hopes being constantly eroded at every turn. Something akin to a "global faith hit points score" which keeps getting down. Bit like the famous Doomsday Clock. It may be a clock-like device which you will have to manually set at every narrative turn to show ...


4

Some possible aids: Don't let the room be the familiar room you play in. Even if it's the same actual room, try covering the walls with dark cloth, for an added touch, make the room as small as possible to create a 'trapped' feeling Don't let the lighting be comfortable. Overhead lighting and eye level lighting are comfortable for people, which is why we ...


3

They wouldn't come back. A zombie is a creature, it is not 'a corpse' which is the specified target for Resurrection. True Resurrection would arguably work, since it doesn't require a corpse. In that case, what happened to the Zombie would be up to the GM. It might conceivably continue to exist, as the True Resurrection spell creates a new body for the ...


3

This site already has some good articles on how to make players feel fear, and that should help with what you are trying to accomplish. A big thing that I would emphasis is time. I ran a zombie outbreak game that revolved around a single city that was successfully quarantined shortly after the outbreak(similar to Resident Evil 2). The players and their ...


3

Zombie apocalypses range from a slug feast (Left4Dead2) to a vehicle for huis-clos building on the survivors' slow but assured spiral into inhumanity (Walking Dead). It seems that you are aiming more towards the latter. For me, Night of the Living Dead and Walking Dead and ... are all scary because they are all about the slow, methodical, and inextricable ...


3

The Setting I've run zombie apocalypse adventures before. The tricks that worked for me were: (1) Start with a lot of low level characters, (2) Have them search for a defendable position, (3) Only hit them with small groups of zombies at first, (4) Let them get comfortable, then (5) over run them with a large "herd" of zombies, and (6) Chase them until they ...


3

Zombie Cinema is fast and fun, allowing one to play through a selection of characters, just like World War Z goes to different POV's every chapter. Check it out.


3

If the zombie used to be a resurrectable creature in life, it is resurrected as that creature. The relevant quote from the description of the undead type is: Not affected by raise dead and reincarnate spells or abilities. Resurrection and true resurrection can affect undead creatures. These spells turn undead creatures back into the living creatures ...


3

If you've been playing with this group for some time, it is possible that they've been taught to play this way. Perhaps you've turned up the 'intrigue' to 11 one too many times. Perhaps they are used to fighting with each other for scarce loot. If they haven't been together long, perhaps there's a player in your group instigating the discord. Maybe they can ...


3

Work WITH your players If I'm going to sit down and play a game for several hours, nevermind for several sessions of several hours, I want to know what genre I'm playing. The "gotcha" campaign doesn't make people as happy as folks think. Tell your players, "I'm planning on doing a zombie outbreak game, and the expectations are that your characters are ...


2

Hot War has zombies (or things very much like zombies) in it, and it uses a very interesting relationship mechanic that ensures that the players will try to make the scenes about each other, their loved ones, their rivals, their enemies, etc.


2

I've never tried the "OMG Zombies !!!" chronicle (even if I would like to play one), but if you are familiar with the systems and have access to the following books, you should have everything needed: World of Darkness World of Darkness: Antagonists : p22-29 : Rules for Zombies World of Darkness: Mirrors, p154+ : The chapter "The World of Darkness ...


2

Greg Porter's EABA game has a supplement called Dark Millennium that covers zombie horror in the Dark Ages (11th century). A modern supplement called "Code:Black" could probably be used to focus on zombie horror instead of a wider palette of "supernatural modern horror" that is its basic premise. I have played in an extended zombie campaign using Porter's ...


2

One of the things that would mess things up as far as existing RPG systems is the nature of combat. Zombies are only taken out with a shot to the head. Humans will eventually become Zombies with just a scratch, or even a bullet going through and grazing them. There'd be no need for hit points or anything of the sort. If a Zombie touches you, you're out of ...



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