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bio website codemines.blogspot.com
location California
age 93
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Apr 11 at 19:57

Mar
31
revised Is there a “sea creatures” RPG system, or would I need to create one?
added 1 characters in body
Mar
31
answered Is there a “sea creatures” RPG system, or would I need to create one?
Mar
18
awarded  Yearling
Feb
28
answered When to give up on an obstacle
Feb
28
comment Does Perfect Preparation allow a caster to prepare any spell on her list?
Yeah, it definitely leaves a lot for the DM and player to work out. It might be that that's entirely intentional - I haven't used the mythic adventures rules, but from browsing the intro material, they're apparently intended to be a way to tie characters into significant events in the game world. You get "mythic" tiers from meeting some significant challenge, or coming into contact with a powerful artifact, or similar life-changing events. Maybe you're supposed to work the explanation for the effect into the description of the event that grants it. That seems sensible.
Feb
28
comment Does Perfect Preparation allow a caster to prepare any spell on her list?
I would think that the last sentence, "You may keep or discard your spellbook or familiar", implies that you don't need your spell book to learn new spells, either. Other than that, I think it's pretty clear that the intent is not to open up all of the spells on the spell list, especially when you compare it to the other tier-1 abilities.
Feb
5
awarded  Commentator
Feb
5
comment Setting up a food pantry/orphanage?
I can't be the only person who read the question title as looking for ways to set up an orphanage which is also a food pantry, right? I thought: "now, that's a dark campaign setting"...
Jan
24
comment Permanently hiding items/objects
Also, Dominate doesn't seem very relevant, in that you can't order the creature to do something self-destructive, like let you cut it open. In fact "Once you have given a dominated creature a command, it continues to attempt to carry out that command to the exclusion of all other activities except those necessary for day-to-day survival (such as sleeping, eating, and so forth)." - a Tarrasque's day-to-day activities are rampaging across the countryside, eating everything in sight. I wonder to what extent Dominate would even be useful on Tarrasque :-)
Jan
24
comment Permanently hiding items/objects
@MatthewNajmon that's a good point, but I think that any attempt to make something "forever irretrievable" is going to run into DM ruling at some point - D&D doesn't have that many truly irreversible effects (and fewer in more-recent versions like Pathfinder).
Jan
22
comment Permanently hiding items/objects
According to the SRD, Greater Create Demiplane can only make a mildly-aligned plane, so that's probably not enough to discourage even a minor deity from visiting. The Dead Magic trait is "like an antimagic field in all respects". A demiplane with no permanent portal and the "Dead Magic" trait would seem to be a pretty effective hiding place for an object, but you'd have to travel there to place anything there, and then you'd be trapped. This is all very campaign/mythos dependent, though. If the gods created the planes, then they can obviously change the properties of your demiplane...
Jan
22
comment Permanently hiding items/objects
A lot will depend on rules versions, and I'm not a Pathfinder expert. I tend towards a fairly-restricted version of Wish in campaigns where it's available. If nothing else, you'd have to at least beat the Tarrasque's Magic Resistance to have any hope of affecting it with Wish. Pathfinder's Wish seems very similar to my usual version, which is pretty much limited to duplicating existing spell effects: d20pfsrd.com/magic/all-spells/w/wish
Jan
22
answered Permanently hiding items/objects
Jan
22
answered Permanently hiding items/objects
Nov
1
comment Should I show the health of enemies?
I also think 4e's "bloodied" condition is a nice addition here. It gives the characters some information about the state of opponents, but keeps the specifics vague - "did it take 4 hits to bring this monster down to 1/2 HP because it has a lot of hit points, or because it's inherently resistant to the weapons/spells we're using"? That's an interesting question, and maybe worth investigation in its own right.
Nov
1
comment Should I show the health of enemies?
I think the focus on trial-and-error is one of the differences between earlier versions and later versions. Consider that pretty much only spells have the "does nothing at all if the creature is greater than x hit points or hit dice" failure mechanism. It adds some drama when a spell-caster uses one of their "best" attacks, and it totally fizzles. To a large extent, the fighters, rangers, and the like never need to worry about this problem. It's yet another price that Wizards pay for their huge power at higher levels.
Mar
18
awarded  Yearling
Feb
13
comment What would be the best system to play a Mission Impossible or James Bond game?
Like I said, the wound location rules did seem a bit out of place. As I recall, it was better to manage not to get shot in the first place, since the result of getting shot was almost always a very serious wound or instant death. The damage & location were figured out with a single roll of two dice, though, so it's not as complex as some systems.
Feb
7
revised What would be the best system to play a Mission Impossible or James Bond game?
added 75 characters in body
Feb
6
answered What would be the best system to play a Mission Impossible or James Bond game?