1,246 reputation
612
bio website kromey.us
location Fairbanks, AK
age 31
visits member for 3 years
seen 7 hours ago

2d
awarded  Yearling
Mar
31
comment How do I remove a poorly-designed rule without my players feeling cheated?
Only thing I'd add is to show the players the math you've done and how unlikely it is for the fractional ability scores to give them any results anyway -- just a little extra evidence to back up your "this house rule sucks and we shouldn't do it anymore" conclusion. In my experience people are much more willing to accept mid-game house rule changes when there's a solid reasoning behind it.
Apr
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
20
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
14
awarded  Yearling
Apr
4
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
26
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
4
awarded  Good Question
Dec
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
6
comment How do you handle verbal exchanges between NPCs without taking the PCs out of the spotlight?
@valadil I'd say don't let them see that there's a script, then. Maybe easier said than done, of course; if you use a GM screen, just hide it behind that, or reference it as you do your other notes. Or just be blunt with them: "Yes, I wrote this script, but only as an aid for myself; you can -- and should -- interject if you feel it is appropriate." Or, if your players won't work with you like that, keep the script idea to rare -- and short! -- scenes that really need to be had, and otherwise use SevenSidedDie's hybrid approach.
Sep
6
comment How do you handle verbal exchanges between NPCs without taking the PCs out of the spotlight?
This is what I do, too. Doesn't seem to bother my players at all, plus it keeps the game moving and minimizes the time that the PCs aren't the focus of the game's spotlight. Sometimes, though, there are essential NPC conversations that must be heard; for these, I write out the script in play format, making sure to take every opportunity to cut corners and abbreviate the scene without making it too contrived, and then having that script in front of me helps to keep me focused and speed things along so we can get back to the PCs -- the real stars of the show!
Jul
21
comment Is it possible to play an Epic D&D3.5/3.75 campaign with a non-magic hero?
@Jeor No-save/no-SR spells are few and far between, and most can be countered with a little forethought. Uncapped spells are also few and far between, and for the life of me I can't think of a single one that doesn't allow a save or bypasses SR. Polymorph has to beat SR and allows a save, and even if it gets through an allied spell caster can reverse it (again, forethought is required). The key really is forethought: Even the most powerful spellcasters can be trivially defeated by a party of comparable level if said party puts in even just a little forethought into it.
Jul
19
answered Is it possible to play an Epic D&D3.5/3.75 campaign with a non-magic hero?
Jul
1
answered Medieval problems in a magical world
Jun
27
comment Stats for a Sorcerer King in 4E's Dark Sun?
On the crossed-out bit: This is what I do regularly in my games -- reskin. I find creatures in the MM or Compendium with the appropriate level and role that I want, then give them wildly different flavor text. Goblins have served as low-level demons, elves as abominations, etc. I also routinely add or swap out powers for my creations, often violating their role to make them fit what I need them to do -- Brutes with pull and reaction powers, for example, normally something associated with Controllers, but it makes them unique -- and more threatening!
Jun
24
answered Does an opportunity attack that stuns prevent the movement?
Jun
21
comment Efficient / flexible terrain - Creating a clear hex grid
My group has always used these Chessex "battle maps", and they're great. You can draw out important stuff with the markers, then plop down some terrain highlights to really make it "pop". I wholeheartedly endorse this suggestion, and also will add that you could look into "papercraft" terrain to really drive up the "wow" factor.