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location Austin, TX
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
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Dec
15
answered How similar is Star Wars Saga to DnD 4th edition?
Aug
2
comment How do I get the PCs to visit scary places at night?
+1 in particular for Maslow's hierarchy. That's outstanding, if I want to know how to motivate the players, I just need to check where their characters are (and maybe remind the players that their chars haven't eaten in days). Awesome tip!
Aug
2
answered How do I help my players figure out how to stay alive in a realistically-deadly sandbox campaign?
Jul
26
comment Dungeons that aren't dungeons
It depends on your definition. "Dense forest" implies a dense canopy, therefore very little light at the forest floor, therefore very little undergrowth. A classic example is the "park forest" of the Pacific northwest.
Jul
24
comment Dungeons that aren't dungeons
Fairy tales and fantasy are fond of spooky dense forest, but if realism is a consideration, note that dense forests are generally quite easy to travel through. There's very little underbrush when the trees block most light and absorb most of the water. Generally, the fringe of a forest by a track or riverbank may be impenetrable, as it gets ample light. Steep slopes + brush + wet vegetation would make travel much harder, whether there are trees overhead or not.
Jun
9
comment How do I allow player agency in situations with predetermined outcomes?
There was a barber and his wife, and she was beautiful...
Jun
1
answered Giving Players the Game They Want
May
10
comment What would you pick as the “four elements” of mind?
I appreciate the comments, Vestrik. You're quite right that any division will be a little fuzzy and arbitrary; the mind is indeed fundamentally inseparable from the personality. I'm trying to put a fresh spin on the concept of mind magic, but this angle may well be a blind alley.
May
6
awarded  Yearling
Apr
13
comment How can characters with low Fighting and Shooting contribute in combat?
As the GM, I don't want to say "you should have thought about that when you made your character, go sit in the corner while the powergamers have fun." I prefer for players to create whatever characters interest them, provided they're appropriate to the game universe of course, and then work together to find things for them to do. Your later paragraphs address this, but a little vaguely; what would these ideas look like in SW terms?
Apr
13
accepted How can characters with low Fighting and Shooting contribute in combat?
Apr
8
comment How can characters with low Fighting and Shooting contribute in combat?
@Runeslinger: Yes, that is very nearly the same thing, I wish I'd seen it when I searched the forum earlier. You're answer there is great from a color perspective, +1. No regrets though, for I think Phil's hit it on the head in this question, from a mechanics perspective.
Apr
7
revised How can characters with low Fighting and Shooting contribute in combat?
Added a link, and a clarification re: mechanics-oriented
Apr
7
asked How can characters with low Fighting and Shooting contribute in combat?
Apr
7
comment What rewards can compete with experience points?
@Curtis: +1 for an answer that emphasizes roleplaying! I'm very glad you overcame your hesitation.
Apr
7
answered Interesting Necromancers?
Apr
7
answered Interesting Necromancers?
Mar
6
comment How to Handle a Powergamer / Munchkin
If you're playing a wargame, sure. In an RPG, the players should build their characters around a concept rather than min/maxing. Each group must find its own happy medium between story and game, of course.
Mar
6
comment How to Handle a Powergamer / Munchkin
Speaking personally, I wouldn't be too happy playing the sidekick, while a single player was the centerpiece to every fight.
Mar
3
comment What alternatives to hit points are there for abstracting wounds?
I think Millennium's End may be simpler! Are wounds uncommon? I imagine that a fight without guns would be as bruising to calculate and track as it would be to participate in.