1,260 reputation
518
bio website twitter.com/ioanwigmore
location Edinburgh, United Kingdom
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen 3 hours ago

Player of RuneQuest, D&D, Deathwatch, Qin.

Dabbler in others.

DM for D&D (4E).


Aug
31
answered Casting Feather Fall on an ballista bolt
Aug
30
comment Techniques for Different Length Game Sessions
Yeah, if your group likes to have a lot of combat, then the combat mechanics of the system you're playing determines how best to structure your game. E.g. if your D&D 4E games tend to have 1hr combat encounters, then a short (1-3hr) game should only have one combat encounter, with the rest of the time filled by skill/social/story bits. This is only an example for a specific playstyle for 4E though, so you can imagine how the advice varies with system and style. Hence needing more specifity.
Aug
6
comment Does flanking always grant advantage, or is it up to discussion?
What does "attacker being helped" mean? Wouldn't flanking count as helping in this case?
Aug
3
awarded  Quorum
Jul
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
24
answered Dungeons that aren't dungeons
Jun
29
comment How to keep track of statuses and conditions?
Aren't poker chips often too large for 1-inch square grids? You'd have trouble as soon as figures become adjacent.
Jun
19
comment In an even fight, how many rounds does a typical monster need to drop a PC?
But if you compare the Next mace with the 4e skirmisher, so that both situations are melee attacks, then all the PCs become more durable in Next than they are in 4e.
Jun
17
revised Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
extra tag
Jun
17
comment Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
It's Warhammer 40k yes, where a lot of combat takes place at medium to short range, meaning that the 90m grenade is almost always usable, as opposed to the more realistic 'close range grenade' which requires a lot of effort to make usable.
Jun
17
comment Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
I'm sorry, unless the enemy troops are Chaos Space Marines, they have grenades of a similar power, and they won't be able to throw them as far as a Deathwatch Space Marine. Also like I said, Space Marines can throw grenades up to 90 metres without any penalty, which I would not call 'close' and certainly wouldn't require sneaking. Like I asked, are the Deathwatch grenade mechanics calibrated for normal humans? You seem to be saying yes(?) and that that is the intention and not a problem because in your game involving normal humans there's not a problem(?)
Jun
15
revised Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
Rewording of the question
Jun
15
comment Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
I guess my question is "am I reading the rules correctly, and should any modifications be needed?" One can argue that the rules work as written, and space marines are indeed lethal with grenades, or one can argue that the scatter distance should increase with thrown distance, or maybe I'm missing some restriction on thrown weapons that takes this into account.
Jun
15
revised Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
Additional paragraph explaining the absurdity of long-range frag grenades
Jun
15
asked Grenade throwing: when even a miss is usually still a hit
Jun
12
comment Can an Undead Servitor act after its controller is dead?
Well my "yes" meant it does not simply stop acting, it will still carrying out the last action asked of it. But yes this is getting tricky to answer...
Jun
12
comment Can an Undead Servitor act after its controller is dead?
Wait, is it possible we actually agree? You say it stops once it completes the last command, I say it continues until there are no more commands (i.e. you're dead).
Jun
12
comment Can an Undead Servitor act after its controller is dead?
Then it's fine!
Jun
12
comment Can an Undead Servitor act after its controller is dead?
It gets more tenous, as I'd argue that a Magic Mouth speaking your words with your voice is not 'you', and thus the Servitor will not obey it. This also prevents someone else from ordering your Servitor about by using recorded fragments of some words you said at some point. So you cannot give the Servitor new orders after your death, but you can possibly still tell it how to act (while you are still alive) once it finds out that you are dead. It would effectively be carrying out your last will and testament :D
Jun
12
comment Clarification on 4e Raise Dead's 'part of the corpse'
Add in something about the time limit for Raise Dead being applicable also to the finger that was cut off (with the timer starting as soon as the finger is removed) and you have my vote :)