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3 completely misread the question, jeez
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NoThere are other arcane spellcasting classes that use spellbooks, butlike the divine spellcastersmagus. The alchemist has a “formula book” that are likeworks mostly the wizard don’t need tosame way, and the witch has a familiar that functions like a spellbook for her.

Clerics and druidsIn all of these cases, however, learning from scrolls is reserved for a class with very wizard-like spellcasting, that is, they must prepare exactly which and otherhow many of each spell they know in advance.

As you note, the divine spellcasters are similar towho, like the wizard in that they must, prepare their spells ahead of time, from a large list don’t need to bother with spellbooks at all. HoweverClerics, thesedruids, and similar divine classes do not need a spellbook: theyspellcasters can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other handside of the coin, oracles and other divinewe have spellcasters whothat do not have to prepare their spells ahead of time. The sorcerer is the quintessential example, are morebut others exist, including some like sorcerersthe oracle that are divine (as you note). These “spontaneous” classes know onlydo not keep a limited numberspellbook or similar, and they cannot take advantage of spellsthe rules for copying a scroll into a spellbook. Scrolls, chosenfor them, can only be used as they level-upa scroll, and nevernot used to learn any spells except by leveling upa spell. So no spellbooks for themTo learn a spell, no learningthey need the vastly more expensive page of spell knowledge, or the even more expensive ring of spell knowledge (which then does allow them limited ability to learn spells from scrolls or spellbooksand other sources). 

The advantage to spontaneous spellcasters is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.

No, but the divine spellcasters that are like the wizard don’t need to.

Clerics and druids and other divine spellcasters are similar to the wizard in that they must prepare their spells ahead of time, from a large list. However, these divine classes do not need a spellbook: they can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other hand, oracles and other divine spellcasters who do not prepare their spells, are more like sorcerers. These classes know only a limited number of spells, chosen as they level-up, and never learn any spells except by leveling up. So no spellbooks for them, no learning from scrolls or spellbooks. The advantage is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.

There are other arcane spellcasting classes that use spellbooks, like the magus. The alchemist has a “formula book” that works mostly the same way, and the witch has a familiar that functions like a spellbook for her.

In all of these cases, however, learning from scrolls is reserved for a class with very wizard-like spellcasting, that is, they must prepare exactly which and how many of each spell they know in advance.

As you note, the divine spellcasters who, like the wizard, prepare spells ahead of time don’t need to bother with spellbooks at all. Clerics, druids, and similar divine spellcasters can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other side of the coin, we have spellcasters that do not have to prepare their spells ahead of time. The sorcerer is the quintessential example, but others exist, including some like the oracle that are divine (as you note). These “spontaneous” classes do not keep a spellbook or similar, and they cannot take advantage of the rules for copying a scroll into a spellbook. Scrolls, for them, can only be used as a scroll, not used to learn a spell. To learn a spell, they need the vastly more expensive page of spell knowledge, or the even more expensive ring of spell knowledge (which then does allow them limited ability to learn spells from scrolls and other sources). 

The advantage to spontaneous spellcasters is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.

2 being clearer
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No, but they also usually have nothe divine spellcasters that are like the wizard don’t need to.

Clerics and druids and other divine spellcasters are similar to the wizard in that they must prepare their spells ahead of time, from a large list. However, these divine classes do not need a spellbook: they can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other hand, oracles and other divine spellcasters who do not prepare their spells, are more like sorcerers. These classes know only a limited number of spells, chosen as they level-up, and never learn any spells except by leveling up. So no spellbooks for them, no learning from scrolls or spellbooks. The advantage is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.

No, but they also usually have no need to.

Clerics and druids and other divine spellcasters are similar to the wizard in that they must prepare their spells ahead of time, from a large list. However, these divine classes do not need a spellbook: they can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other hand, oracles and other divine spellcasters who do not prepare their spells, are more like sorcerers. These classes know only a limited number of spells, chosen as they level-up, and never learn any spells except by leveling up. The advantage is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.

No, but the divine spellcasters that are like the wizard don’t need to.

Clerics and druids and other divine spellcasters are similar to the wizard in that they must prepare their spells ahead of time, from a large list. However, these divine classes do not need a spellbook: they can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other hand, oracles and other divine spellcasters who do not prepare their spells, are more like sorcerers. These classes know only a limited number of spells, chosen as they level-up, and never learn any spells except by leveling up. So no spellbooks for them, no learning from scrolls or spellbooks. The advantage is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.

1
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No, but they also usually have no need to.

Clerics and druids and other divine spellcasters are similar to the wizard in that they must prepare their spells ahead of time, from a large list. However, these divine classes do not need a spellbook: they can pray for any spell on their list, even one they have never seen before. In effect, you can think of the gods they pray to as being giant spellbooks that already have every spell available ready to go.

On the other hand, oracles and other divine spellcasters who do not prepare their spells, are more like sorcerers. These classes know only a limited number of spells, chosen as they level-up, and never learn any spells except by leveling up. The advantage is that they are free to use these spells in any combination they like, up to their spells per day limit, where spellcasters that prepare have to choose exactly how many of each spell they want. However, generally speaking, the advantage of having access to so many spells is vastly superior, so clerics and druids and wizards are generally better than oracles and sorcerers and the like.