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No, there is not an engineering background, and this makes sense for the default fantasy-medieval Forgotten Realms setting in 5E.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world. In fact, the need to systematically study engineering would mightprobably be even less, since you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists, and engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

No, there is not an engineering background, and this makes sense for the default fantasy-medieval Forgotten Realms setting in 5E.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world. In fact, the need to systematically study engineering would might be even less, since you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

No, there is not an engineering background, and this makes sense for the default fantasy-medieval Forgotten Realms setting in 5E.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world. In fact, the need to systematically study engineering would probably be even less, since you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists, and engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

5 added 187 characters in body
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No, there is not an engineering background, and this makes sense for the default fantasy-medieval Forgotten Realms setting in 5E.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world — and perhaps. In fact, the need to systematically study engineering would might be even less so, whensince you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists — engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world — and perhaps even less so, when you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists — engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

No, there is not an engineering background, and this makes sense for the default fantasy-medieval Forgotten Realms setting in 5E.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world. In fact, the need to systematically study engineering would might be even less, since you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists — engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

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"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world — and perhaps even less so, when you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists — engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world — and perhaps even less so, when you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists — engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

"Engineering" as a discipline in the real world emerged with the Industrial Revolution. Sure, in constructing aqueducts and roads and pyramids and bridges, ancient and classical civilizations engaged in something we might use that label for, but they didn't think of it in that way. From Wikipedia on the history of structural engineering:

Throughout ancient and medieval history most architectural design and construction was carried out by artisans, such as stone masons and carpenters, rising to the role of master builder. No theory of structures existed and understanding of how structures stood up was extremely limited, and based almost entirely on empirical evidence of 'what had worked before'. Knowledge was retained by guilds and seldom supplanted by advances. Structures were repetitive, and increases in scale were incremental.

The default D&D 5E setting is Forgotten Realms, where we have Is there an official reason the Forgotten Realms is stuck with “medieval” technology? — in other words, there's no particular reason to expect that the situation would be any different from the medieval real world — and perhaps even less so, when you can just build with magic.

Of course, D&D settings tend to be random pastiches of appealing heroic settings and archetypes, regardless of actual timelines. That means even though an Indiana-Jones type character is anachronistic, the game bends towards allowing it — see my question on education for archaeologists — engineering is a similar high-education non-magical career path, and a Jules Verne-style D&D hero seems... unsurprising.

Since the Eberron campaign setting is more steampunk, I thought perhaps there would be an option in the 5E Eberron conversion, but tinkerer seems to be the closest — or maybe dwarf-aligned clan crafter. But tinkerer is rather gadget and small-device focused, and you might not want the dwarf theming; in that case, I think a custom background is currently your best bet. Or, in line with the quote above, perhaps take a second look at Guild Artisan.

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