7 added 1 character in body
source | link

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefortherefore unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting.

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting.

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefore unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting.

6 edited body
source | link

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from DragonTalk podcast from JanJan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting. Unfortunately, I can't find a way to link directly to it on Wizard's site.

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting. Unfortunately, I can't find a way to link directly to it on Wizard's site.

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting.

5 added 22 characters in body
source | link

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting. Unfortunately, I can't find a way to link directly to it on Wizard's site.

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting. Unfortunately, I can't find a way to link directly to it on Wizard's site.

Spells with Saves

You've quoted the entire text of Magical Ambush:

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

At multiple times, the designers of 5E have indicated that the game is meant to be parsed as normal language whenever possible.1 In other words, logic says if a spell affects a creature, then that spell was cast on that creature. Conversely, logic says if the spell wasn't cast on the creature, then they couldn't be affected by it. The fact that an area of effect is aimed at a point for targeting purposes, doesn't mean the spell is cast on that point alone.

It's pretty cut and dry - if the caster is hidden when the spell is cast, the target has disadvantage on the save. There's no more complexity to it. The type of spell doesn't matter, other than needing to be a spell that requires a save.

Spells with Attack Rolls

As an aside, if the caster is hidden and therefor unseen, he gets advantage on a spell attack roll, too.

1As @Slagmoth indicates in the comments, there is a DragonTalk podcast from Jan 19, 2017 where this is detailed by Jeremy Crawford, specifically addressing spellcasting. Unfortunately, I can't find a way to link directly to it on Wizard's site.

4 added 26 characters in body
source | link
3 added 740 characters in body
source | link
2 added 347 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link