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2 going with the other term.
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There is not always a 'Speaker''Caller'

'Speaker''Caller' is the term I have seen used to refer to the player with the responsibility of declaring the final decisions of the group to the GM. 5th edition D&D does not require a speaker, nor does the DMG particularly encourage having one.

Having a 'Speaker''Caller' can be normal, but it does not seem to be usual at present

There are definitely cultural subgroups where having a speakercaller is the way the game is played, always. Many older players of D&D will find this format more usual, I suspect-- I have seen it much more frequently in AD&D and OD&D (BECMI or B/X) groups. The OSRIC rulebook, a rpg system designed to be a sort of updated, freely available homage to early D&D gaming, specifically addresses the existence of speakers'callers', which again reinforces the idea to me that this is a tradition from older rpging culture groups, while the Moldvay Basic manual addresses the same, as yet more evidence.  

In any case, it is a fine, and in many cases culturally normal, way to play, which trades GM involvement with each of the players for greatly increased ease of play for large groups. Nonetheless, most groups, in my experience, do not play this way, and I've not seen any play this way at Adventurer's League events.

There is not always a 'Speaker'

'Speaker' is the term I have seen used to refer to the player with the responsibility of declaring the final decisions of the group to the GM. 5th edition D&D does not require a speaker, nor does the DMG particularly encourage having one.

Having a 'Speaker' can be normal, but it does not seem to be usual at present

There are definitely cultural subgroups where having a speaker is the way the game is played, always. Many older players of D&D will find this format more usual, I suspect-- I have seen it much more frequently in AD&D and OD&D (BECMI or B/X) groups. The OSRIC rulebook, a rpg system designed to be a sort of updated, freely available homage to early D&D gaming, specifically addresses the existence of speakers, which again reinforces the idea to me that this is a tradition from older rpging culture groups.  

In any case, it is a fine, and in many cases culturally normal, way to play, which trades GM involvement with each of the players for greatly increased ease of play for large groups. Nonetheless, most groups, in my experience, do not play this way, and I've not seen any play this way at Adventurer's League events.

There is not always a 'Caller'

'Caller' is the term I have seen used to refer to the player with the responsibility of declaring the final decisions of the group to the GM. 5th edition D&D does not require a speaker, nor does the DMG particularly encourage having one.

Having a 'Caller' can be normal, but it does not seem to be usual at present

There are definitely cultural subgroups where having a caller is the way the game is played, always. Many older players of D&D will find this format more usual, I suspect-- I have seen it much more frequently in AD&D and OD&D (BECMI or B/X) groups. The OSRIC rulebook, a rpg system designed to be a sort of updated, freely available homage to early D&D gaming, specifically addresses the existence of 'callers', which again reinforces the idea to me that this is a tradition from older rpging culture groups, while the Moldvay Basic manual addresses the same, as yet more evidence.

In any case, it is a fine, and in many cases culturally normal, way to play, which trades GM involvement with each of the players for greatly increased ease of play for large groups. Nonetheless, most groups, in my experience, do not play this way, and I've not seen any play this way at Adventurer's League events.

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source | link

There is not always a 'Speaker'

'Speaker' is the term I have seen used to refer to the player with the responsibility of declaring the final decisions of the group to the GM. 5th edition D&D does not require a speaker, nor does the DMG particularly encourage having one.

Having a 'Speaker' can be normal, but it does not seem to be usual at present

There are definitely cultural subgroups where having a speaker is the way the game is played, always. Many older players of D&D will find this format more usual, I suspect-- I have seen it much more frequently in AD&D and OD&D (BECMI or B/X) groups. The OSRIC rulebook, a rpg system designed to be a sort of updated, freely available homage to early D&D gaming, specifically addresses the existence of speakers, which again reinforces the idea to me that this is a tradition from older rpging culture groups.

In any case, it is a fine, and in many cases culturally normal, way to play, which trades GM involvement with each of the players for greatly increased ease of play for large groups. Nonetheless, most groups, in my experience, do not play this way, and I've not seen any play this way at Adventurer's League events.