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The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple offew expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and, Action Surge and eventually Indomitable - bothall of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily/dynamically adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep in mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple of expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and Action Surge - both of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep in mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a few expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind, Action Surge and eventually Indomitable - all of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily/dynamically adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep in mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

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The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple of expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and Action Surge - both of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep in mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple of expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and Action Surge - both of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple of expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and Action Surge - both of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep in mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

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The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, andwhich holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players;players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple of expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and Action Surge - both of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about priority of target andtactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

In 5e, the Champion archetypeThe choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot to begin with, at least for your daughter;lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes to begin with, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, and is generally well suited to new players; it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety. Though there are still choices to make, they tend to be about priority of target and positioning as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

In 5e, the Champion archetype choice at 3rd level is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot to begin with, at least for your daughter; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes to begin with, and introduce concepts slowly.

The Fighter is a simple, easy to play class

The Fighter is traditionally the simplest class available in D&D, which holds true in 5th edition. It is generally well suited to new players as it's tough and survivable, and it rewards a simple playstyle of the "go over there and hit that thing!" variety.

Compared to other classes, it has only a couple of expendable class features that need to be kept track of (Second Wind and Action Surge - both of which are themselves pretty simple abilities), no abilities that temporarily adjust other stats/bonuses, and no complex conditional abilities to keep mind. Though there are still choices to make as a Fighter, they tend to be about tactical positioning and how to prioritise targets as opposed to trying to parse your long list of class features/spells and evaluate which one you want to use, which you understandably want to avoid for a new player - especially a very young one who may have difficulty understanding all those options.

The choice of martial archetype at 3rd level can make the class more complicated, but the Champion archetype is the simplest of the available options, as it grants a handful of passive, always-on benefits in the same vein as the basic class features. The other archetypes available in the core - Eldritch Knight and Battlemaster - introduce spells and manoeuvres to the class. They might be interesting to look at if your daughter turns out to be unexpectedly adept at understanding the game and you think she can handle a bit more complexity, but the Champion is always there to keep it simple if required.

Are you sure you want to play D&D though

Stepping back a bit, though, I would advise you and your girlfriend to consider whether or not D&D is the best first RPG for a seven-year-old. Though D&D is very popular, and it's undoubtedly the first RPG that lots of people end up playing, they do tend to get into the hobby at a later age; D&D is relatively complicated as roleplaying games go. There are other, simpler games, including games aimed at children of her age, which you could search for and start to play with instead. If the goal is to get her interested in the hobby she's less likely to bounce off such games and get put off than if she tries and fails to understand the complexities of D&D.

That's not to say that D&D is an impossible starter game for a young child, and I'm sure there are many players who started at a similarly young age and had a great time. If you do want to stick with D&D, I would probably advise that you simplify it a lot; abstract away the details, handle the game mechanics behind the scenes, and introduce concepts slowly. It's not important that she knows that she's a first level fighter with a +2 proficiency bonus off the bat; you could simply give her a sheet that says she's got 13 HP and a +4 bonus to hitting things with swords, and teach her the core mechanics before revealing more complex concepts and explaining how those details are derived.

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