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They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so Inow they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

Their Surprise is based off them reacting tonot a new threattype of round, but ifit's a condition that nullifies their first action in combat. If they don't know there's a threatcombat, then they never became Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fightthey're not taking combat actions, and they aren't surprised yet. Since the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hiddensurprise hasn't been ruined, they could potentially get multiple Surprise different targets at differenteasily be surprised in later rounds, aswhen the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawnplayers do get around to spooking the enemy out fightof their pants.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

Their Surprise is based off them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat then they never became Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise different targets at different, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so now they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

Surprise is not a type of round, it's a condition that nullifies their first action in combat. If they don't know there's combat, then they're not taking combat actions, and they aren't surprised yet. Since the surprise hasn't been ruined, they could easily be surprised in later rounds, when the players do get around to spooking the enemy out of their pants.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

4 deleted 211 characters in body
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They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

In this circumstance, if the enemy team was "surprised" but never knew there was a threat even after the surprise round ended, then they simply didn't have a combat round in the first place. TheirTheir Surprise is based off them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat in the first place then they never became Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise different targets at different, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

In this circumstance, if the enemy team was "surprised" but never knew there was a threat even after the surprise round ended, then they simply didn't have a combat round in the first place. Their Surprise is based off them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat in the first place then they never became Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise different targets at different, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

Their Surprise is based off them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat then they never became Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise different targets at different, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

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They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I get a Surprise round"they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

In this circumstance, if the enemy team was "surprised" but never knew there was a threat even after the surprise round ended, then they simply didn't have a combat round in the first place. A Their Surprise Round is based off them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat in the first place then they never got a Surprise Roundbecame Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise Roundsdifferent targets at different, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they repeat their Surprise Roundssimply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, a Surprise Round Surprise can still be obtained.

They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I get a Surprise round".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

In this circumstance, if the enemy team was "surprised" but never knew there was a threat even after the surprise round ended, then they simply didn't have a combat round in the first place. A Surprise Round is them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat in the first place then they never got a Surprise Round to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise Rounds, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they repeat their Surprise Rounds until they do. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, a Surprise Round can be obtained.

They could still be surprised, but it depends on a number of things.

One particularly important part about Surprise is that the DM has to be the one actively deciding each time it's applied. Unlike stealth, buffs, healing, or other calculations regarding how it works, Surprise isn't necessarily as simple as "I rolled high, so I they're Surprised".

Generally, for Surprise to work, the people in question need to believe there is no active threat. This means that they shouldn't be doing guard duty, couldn't have heard or seen someone get banished, or have any reason to believe that combat has initiated.

If, for example, a guard was separate from his encampment, and was banished before he could alert his friends, the rest of the camp would have no idea still until something proves otherwise.

In this circumstance, if the enemy team was "surprised" but never knew there was a threat even after the surprise round ended, then they simply didn't have a combat round in the first place. Their Surprise is based off them reacting to a new threat, but if they don't know there's a threat in the first place then they never became Surprised to begin with.

So if it's round 2-3 of a fight, and the players are casting Silence and doing other things to remain hidden, they could potentially get multiple Surprise different targets at different, as the combat events are starting-ending in short bursts rather than a single drawn out fight.

To make this simpler, I'd roll initiative for the entire encampment + players, but if a combatant doesn't know there's any reason for alarm, they simply do not take combat-related actions until they do or until they're Surprised. Mechanically, though, it should be treated as a string of short fights, which are individually considered for Surprise Rounds.


This is separate from being "hidden" which is just one way to avoid being detected to get a Surprise Round. Another method could be to simply start attacking someone who thinks of you as an ally. Even without a stealth check, Surprise can still be obtained.

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