4 edited body
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Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu You have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works). The trick is to drop multiple hints that point toward the same in world fact from differing perspectives.

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works). The trick is to drop multiple hints that point toward the same in world fact from differing perspectives.

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. You have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works). The trick is to drop multiple hints that point toward the same in world fact from differing perspectives.

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

3 added 93 characters in body
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Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, AlexandrianThree Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works). The trick is to drop multiple hints that point toward the same in world fact from differing perspectives.

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works).

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works). The trick is to drop multiple hints that point toward the same in world fact from differing perspectives.

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

2 edited body
source | link

sureSure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works).

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works).

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

Sure, it's not a problem

But regardless, my basic question is whether to allow people to recreate their beloved characters.

If that's what's fun for them, then don't get in their way. I've been playing D&D with the same crazy mugs from high school, off and on, since about 1975. One of them has, in our 5e campaigns, created the same dwarf five or six times, and even named him the same most of those times. That's what he loves: dwarves. The rest of us have a variety of favorite characters, to include one who has made the same Totem of the Bear Barbarian four games in a row. None of us, as fellow players or DM's, object to that. We roll with it.

Go to where the fun is.

The TPK is not inevitable.

There are a variety of ways for you to signal to those three that they can't take down this dragon, up to and including them falling in combat and waking up, in chains, as the dragon's prisoner. You have a lot of latitude as DM to shape the adventure. YOu have the ability to shape and craft the information that the players receive that allows them to make decisions In Character. (Look up the Three Clue Rule, Alexandrian, for an idea on how this tool works).

Don't let the published adventure railroad you as a DM. You are in charge.

It's OK to role play the encounter with the dragon as a horrifying prospect of "you all shall die unless you agree to serve me" or "unless you agree to do this one thing for me." (Pick a quest, or problem, in the published adventure, or make one up.)

You can also have various monsters or NPC's alert the characters of the lethal threat awaiting them. Dragons leave traces of their existence.

But even with any hints or clues, a failure/TPK can happen.

No worries, have them create new characters, and then Do Not Interfere with that process. Let it grow organically from the players.

You are the DM. You run and own the whole world. What you don't run, and what you don't own, are the player characters. So let them be what is fun for them.

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