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This is an unnecessary complicationThe rules are mum on pregnancy and making your own could be too complicated

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, (and I hesitate to bring this up, but....) Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life in the United States. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple, but ultimately it's up to the DM to decide.

This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life in the United States. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

The rules are mum on pregnancy and making your own could be too complicated

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, (and I hesitate to bring this up, but....) Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life in the United States. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple, but ultimately it's up to the DM to decide.

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This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life in the United States. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life in the United States. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

2 added 121 characters in body
source | link

This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer.

Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

This is an unnecessary complication

You're opening a Supreme Court sized can of worms here. There is nothing in the rules to support an answer because pregnancy is not addressed in 5e in anyway. Any solution must therefore be a homebrew one.

That said, Roe vs. Wade established the third trimester of pregnancy as the point at which a fetus could become a viable life. From a D&D rules standpoint, a fetus before this point would not qualify as an independent creature and therefore would be banished along with the mother.

However, it's incredibly messy (figuratively and literally) to use this metric to determine what happens to an unborn child in such a situation so prudence dictates that a fetus should be banished with the mother to keep things simple.

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