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There's a few answers to this that all sort of interlock.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

You don't need to be super strict about the item count, but if your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, that's their fun, so you probably should play into that theme and make the PC a major source of items rather than presenting them in treasure hordes.

Reduce the number of random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a several commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula or schema for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what kindtype of weapon to make when there's a choice, like choosing a maul vs a longsword), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.

There's a few answers to this that all sort of interlock.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

You don't need to be super strict about the item count, but if your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, that's their fun, so you probably should play into that theme and make the PC a major source of items rather than presenting them in treasure hordes.

Reduce the number of random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a several commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula or schema for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what kind of weapon to make when there's a choice), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.

There's a few answers to this that all sort of interlock.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

You don't need to be super strict about the item count, but if your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, that's their fun, so you probably should play into that theme and make the PC a major source of items rather than presenting them in treasure hordes.

Reduce the number of random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a several commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula or schema for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what type of weapon to make when there's a choice, like choosing a maul vs a longsword), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.

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There's a few answers to this that all sort of interlock.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

IfYou don't need to be super strict about the item count, but if your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, let him -- that's histheir fun, and it's not wrong to doso you probably should play into that theme and make the PC a major source of items rather than presenting them in treasure hordes. You should probably reduce

Reduce the number of random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a fewseveral commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula (or "schema" in Eberron)or schema for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what kind of weapon to make when there's a choice), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.

There's a few answers to this.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

If your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, let him -- that's his fun, and it's not wrong to do that. You should probably reduce the random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a few commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula (or "schema" in Eberron) for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what kind of weapon to make when there's a choice), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.

There's a few answers to this that all sort of interlock.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

You don't need to be super strict about the item count, but if your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, that's their fun, so you probably should play into that theme and make the PC a major source of items rather than presenting them in treasure hordes.

Reduce the number of random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a several commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula or schema for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what kind of weapon to make when there's a choice), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.

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There's a few answers to this.

Yes, reduce the number of awarded magical items.

If your forge cleric really wants to be a crafter, let him -- that's his fun, and it's not wrong to do that. You should probably reduce the random magic items they find, or at least pull down the level of them -- instead of finding a rare and several uncommons, maybe they find a couple uncommons and a few commons.

The common items in Xanathar's Guide (and other items you might invent along the same power level lines) can make it feel like the party is collecting cool magical stuff while not actually raising their power in a meaningful way.

You control which items are available for crafting.

The DMG is pretty clear that you get to tell the player yes or no (or better yet, "yes, and") for any magic item they're looking to build. They have to locate the formula (or "schema" in Eberron) for building the item -- which might be provided by divine inspiration in this case -- and you're free to declare specific items or locations involved in the creation process.

Here's what I would do in your situation:

When the PCs kill a particularly powerful monster or NPC that would otherwise have some Rare+ items in its horde, instead they obtain a magically powerful ingredient. It might might be a part of the monster they just took down (like taking a troll's heart or a dragon's largest fang after you slay it), an object in the horde that has innate power (a chunk of adamant ore, a shimmering crystal shard, a potted bloodvine plant, a mandrake root preserved in salt from a widow's tears), or a preserved monster part (a dried rakshasa paw, a phial of angel's blood, a mummified imp, a gorgon's eye sealed in lucite), whatever seems flavorful to you.

The Cleric gets a moment of divine enlightenment that clues him in on what the item is and what it might be used for -- essentially giving him a list of two to four items that this particular ingredient might be used to empower. So he can't just build any-old-thing at any time, but he can make some choices about what to make and who to make it for (including, for example, choosing what kind of weapon to make when there's a choice), and if he really wants a particular item, you can work with the player to come up with what sort of ingredient they need to locate, with appropriate adventures attached.

Don't worry about it too much.

Even if you go overboard and let the party have too many items, it isn't that bad. The game tends to self-correct; the player characters have limits on how many strong items they can use due to the attunement rules; and if they get too strong it just means they level up faster and start fighting tougher monsters that bring it all back into balance.

Having a bag full of magic stuff they aren't really using is a good opportunity to let them trade away some of it for favors or other benefits, or they can have some NPC companions who would like to use those items even if the PCs have better stuff.