7 deleted 59 characters in body
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Disclaimer: After some concerns regarding copyright, I felt a bit bad about the previous images I was using. I replaced it by one I made with using PowerPoint and crayons.


This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using somethinghomemade spellcards to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here.

Those are printed on adhesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard. enter image description here

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rummaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have available.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on adhesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rummaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have available.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

Disclaimer: After some concerns regarding copyright, I felt a bit bad about the previous images I was using. I replaced it by one I made with using PowerPoint and crayons.


This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using homemade spellcards to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit.

enter image description here

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rummaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have available.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

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6 fixed spelling
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This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on ahdesiveadhesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rumagingrummaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have avaiableavailable.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on ahdesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rumaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have avaiable.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on adhesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rummaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have available.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

5 added 24 characters in body
source | link

This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on ahdesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they cast ano longer have the spell prepared, they give me backhand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rumaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have avaiable.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on ahdesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they cast a spell, they give me back the card.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rumaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have avaiable.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

This looks like a job for a good set of props!

Let her roll a wizard, but spice things up a bit so that preparing spells becomes less of a chore.

From my experience, most of the time that players are ignoring the "prepare spells" rule - for Wizards, Clerics, and whatever else prepares spells - it happens not because of malice, but because this is a very boring mechanic for them. Some people like this prep, but others really dislike it.

Solution?

I've been using something to help my players to keep track of their prepared spells with minimum hassle. I made the process more interesting and colorful for them, and it helped me out quite a bit:

I make those myself, using a Hearthstone Card Generator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Those are printed on ahdesive paper, and then glued to high-quality cardboard.

My players prepare their spells by building a "deck", which is kept with their character sheets. When they no longer have the spell prepared, they hand the card back to me.

This creates a very fun mechanic of picking and choosing spells. Instead of rumaging over an endless, boring list your players can touch the spell cards. They can fiddle with them, look at pretty pictures. They can hold their spells during the game, flipping over them to take their decisions or to check what they have avaiable.

And, best of all - when they figure out that they have that one spell that is needed for the encounter, they can toss it on the middle of the table, on a very joyful heck yeah! moment.

If you do something like that, your problem player won't have a way to "evade" the regular spell preparation routine. Either she has the spell card, or she doesn't. If she doesn't, she can't cast it. Simple as that.

That said, I doubt she will try to cheat if you have those props in place. Fiddling with spell cards is fun as hell.

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