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Aaron3468
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The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge
  • Effects coordinated with a party member to place you in a space.

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you vacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice. In the case that they're forced unwillingly into the space after/before movement, such as by a grapple, I wouldn't require them to spend their action economy (misty step, breaking grapples, etc) to vacate the space but movement must vacate it if possible.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

    You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. In the case that they're forced unwillingly into the space after/before movement, such as by a grapple, RAW does not require action economy (misty step, breaking grapples, dashes, etc) to be spent on vacating the space.

Sidenote to 1: The rules are unclear whether a player may receive their once-per-turn movement and not spend it to remain occupying the space, but this is clearly against the spirit of the rule. If a player has movement, I believe it should be spent to vacate the space. I also believe that actions a player controls (such as misty step and falling from above) should not cause the space to be occupied, but I would rule these on a case-by-case basis.

  1. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  2. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge
  • Effects coordinated with a party member to place you in a space.

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you vacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice. In the case that they're forced unwillingly into the space after/before movement, such as by a grapple, I wouldn't require them to spend their action economy (misty step, breaking grapples, etc) to vacate the space but movement must vacate it if possible.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge
  • Effects coordinated with a party member to place you in a space.

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. In the case that they're forced unwillingly into the space after/before movement, such as by a grapple, RAW does not require action economy (misty step, breaking grapples, dashes, etc) to be spent on vacating the space.

Sidenote to 1: The rules are unclear whether a player may receive their once-per-turn movement and not spend it to remain occupying the space, but this is clearly against the spirit of the rule. If a player has movement, I believe it should be spent to vacate the space. I also believe that actions a player controls (such as misty step and falling from above) should not cause the space to be occupied, but I would rule these on a case-by-case basis.

  1. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  2. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

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Aaron3468
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The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge
  • Effects coordinated with a party member to place you in a space.

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you vacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice. In the case that they're forced unwillingly into the space after/before movement, such as by a grapple, I wouldn't require them to spend their action economy (misty step, breaking grapples, etc) to vacate the space but movement must vacate it if possible.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you vacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge
  • Effects coordinated with a party member to place you in a space.

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you vacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice. In the case that they're forced unwillingly into the space after/before movement, such as by a grapple, I wouldn't require them to spend their action economy (misty step, breaking grapples, etc) to vacate the space but movement must vacate it if possible.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

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Aaron3468
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The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Effects that set your movement to 0, or prevent you from leaving a space will generally count as unwilling. Unfortunately willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions.Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Included in unwilling movement effects, a hostile creature may have the ability to opportunity attack grapple you or possess an aura with a chance of reducing your movement. An effect guaranteed to stopWilling and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge

Regarding your movement (and shared with the players) will probably be considered willing.examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you accomplish thisvacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Effects that set your movement to 0, or prevent you from leaving a space will generally count as unwilling. Unfortunately willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Included in unwilling movement effects, a hostile creature may have the ability to opportunity attack grapple you or possess an aura with a chance of reducing your movement. An effect guaranteed to stop your movement (and shared with the players) will probably be considered willing.

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you accomplish this by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

The rule requires that you not willingly end your turn in another creature's space. Sometimes you will be prevented from taking actions in order to make sure the rule holds true.

The DM always has jurisdiction over edge-cases like this and will often make rulings on consequences and benefits, so although I speak from the perspective of being a DM myself, my own interpretations will not always hold true.

Willing and unwilling do not have mechanical definitions, but here's how I would rule them for practical use.

Unwilling:

  • Effects that have a risk but not a guarantee of forcing your turn to end in that space

Willing:

  • Effects that guarantee you will end your turn in that space which are not hidden from player knowledge

Regarding your examples:

  1. You must not willingly spend movement to end in the creature's space. Whether you vacate the space by not moving there, by dashing, or through other means is your choice.

  2. This is a tougher one to rule on. RAW you can attempt to spend movement to pass through the space and unwillingly have your movement reduced to 0 in that space. The creature must be friendly or your size class has to permit movement through it's space (size class overrules this general rule).

  3. This would likely require a rollback. You willingly spent movement and then realized it was movement you couldn't use. You broke a rule, the DM will likely undo the action that broke it or offer you an alternative (such as taking disadvantage).

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Aaron3468
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