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3 separate the general and specific parts of the question
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Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)

 

As for how to "reveal" the cube, don't bring it out of the dungeon – gelatinous cubes are not creatures of the outdoors and wouldn't have any reason to go out. Instead, let it wander off into the dungeon and be encountered another time. Your player will be constantly on the lookout for it (which is awesome, because they're deeply engaged with the place). In order to show them that it's not quite what it seems, remember that cubes can move in every direction – what are the chances that it moves toward the party with the armour oriented toward them again, next time the meet it? If the suit is moving sideways or backwards down the hall toward them, that's much less threatening. It will give the player another piece of information, and it might be the piece that makes them reject their current theory about it and start trying to figure out anew what it is.

I definitely wouldn't bring it out into the daylight. That's too much like literally holding it up and showing them that it's not mysterious. Your player may be relieved, but you might also find that they're suddenly disappointed by the whole thing. People strive to reveal mysteries because they want them to be known, but they resent having the answers just handed to them.

Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)

As for how to "reveal" the cube, don't bring it out of the dungeon – gelatinous cubes are not creatures of the outdoors and wouldn't have any reason to go out. Instead, let it wander off into the dungeon and be encountered another time. Your player will be constantly on the lookout for it (which is awesome, because they're deeply engaged with the place). In order to show them that it's not quite what it seems, remember that cubes can move in every direction – what are the chances that it moves toward the party with the armour oriented toward them again, next time the meet it? If the suit is moving sideways or backwards down the hall toward them, that's much less threatening. It will give the player another piece of information, and it might be the piece that makes them reject their current theory about it and start trying to figure out anew what it is.

I definitely wouldn't bring it out into the daylight. That's too much like literally holding it up and showing them that it's not mysterious. Your player may be relieved, but you might also find that they're suddenly disappointed by the whole thing. People strive to reveal mysteries because they want them to be known, but they resent having the answers just handed to them.

Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)

 

As for how to "reveal" the cube, don't bring it out of the dungeon – gelatinous cubes are not creatures of the outdoors and wouldn't have any reason to go out. Instead, let it wander off into the dungeon and be encountered another time. Your player will be constantly on the lookout for it (which is awesome, because they're deeply engaged with the place). In order to show them that it's not quite what it seems, remember that cubes can move in every direction – what are the chances that it moves toward the party with the armour oriented toward them again, next time the meet it? If the suit is moving sideways or backwards down the hall toward them, that's much less threatening. It will give the player another piece of information, and it might be the piece that makes them reject their current theory about it and start trying to figure out anew what it is.

I definitely wouldn't bring it out into the daylight. That's too much like literally holding it up and showing them that it's not mysterious. Your player may be relieved, but you might also find that they're suddenly disappointed by the whole thing. People strive to reveal mysteries because they want them to be known, but they resent having the answers just handed to them.

2 how to reveal the cube
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Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)

As for how to "reveal" the cube, don't bring it out of the dungeon – gelatinous cubes are not creatures of the outdoors and wouldn't have any reason to go out. Instead, let it wander off into the dungeon and be encountered another time. Your player will be constantly on the lookout for it (which is awesome, because they're deeply engaged with the place). In order to show them that it's not quite what it seems, remember that cubes can move in every direction – what are the chances that it moves toward the party with the armour oriented toward them again, next time the meet it? If the suit is moving sideways or backwards down the hall toward them, that's much less threatening. It will give the player another piece of information, and it might be the piece that makes them reject their current theory about it and start trying to figure out anew what it is.

I definitely wouldn't bring it out into the daylight. That's too much like literally holding it up and showing them that it's not mysterious. Your player may be relieved, but you might also find that they're suddenly disappointed by the whole thing. People strive to reveal mysteries because they want them to be known, but they resent having the answers just handed to them.

Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)

Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)

As for how to "reveal" the cube, don't bring it out of the dungeon – gelatinous cubes are not creatures of the outdoors and wouldn't have any reason to go out. Instead, let it wander off into the dungeon and be encountered another time. Your player will be constantly on the lookout for it (which is awesome, because they're deeply engaged with the place). In order to show them that it's not quite what it seems, remember that cubes can move in every direction – what are the chances that it moves toward the party with the armour oriented toward them again, next time the meet it? If the suit is moving sideways or backwards down the hall toward them, that's much less threatening. It will give the player another piece of information, and it might be the piece that makes them reject their current theory about it and start trying to figure out anew what it is.

I definitely wouldn't bring it out into the daylight. That's too much like literally holding it up and showing them that it's not mysterious. Your player may be relieved, but you might also find that they're suddenly disappointed by the whole thing. People strive to reveal mysteries because they want them to be known, but they resent having the answers just handed to them.

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Be sure that your omnipotent perspective as the GM isn't solely responsible for leading you to believe that your player is being overly-cautious. Caution is a function not only of what someone is dealing with, but is also and much more a function of available intel on the danger. It might be that they're being properly cautious for the degree of knowledge that have to work with, and you and they are coming to different conclusions because you have perfect knowledge. Perfect knowledge robs many things of their deserved scariness.

If you're sure that your player is being overly-cautious, then the advice of the other answers is excellent. If, however, your birds-eye view is giving you an erroneous idea of how cautious someone who is both figuratively and literally in the dark should be, then there's nothing wrong that needs fixing.

I've very often been in the GM's seat and had to bite my tongue when players turn back, when I know there's easy treasure right around the corner, or the threat they're fleeing is totally within their means to defeat. It happens every time I GM, and it's just the difference between operating with omniscience and operating with limited knowledge. I've gotten used to it; now when my players press on and discover something, I know they earned it! I didn't hand it to them with hints and leading them around by the nose.

(Oh, and this isn't to be overlooked: there is a benefit to you in your players retreating. It means that your prepared material is going to last longer than you expected. Enjoy that!)