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If you have a multi-axis reputation system where NPC's have affinity for similar PC's, then signs of items worn by the character, or actions performed could play into that. The drunk at the bar could take issue with a sober character sitting there too long, or the NobelNoble Lady could shun those who are wearing battered armor and rags, but talk to those who are in silks or well maintained matching armor. Beggars might ignore or beg... etc. However if these things become gateways to quests or such then they take on an entirely different aspect. One way around that is to have a hidden latency on the effect. Characterseffect; characters usually dressed in silks all the time that don rags, don't fool the beggars, until they've been wearing them for some time. (aA disguise skill could mediate how fast thatthe transition takes place in that case)

You could also have the characterplayer determine at creation time what demeanor they will have...the character has; if they choose SoberSober, they are easily incapacitated by alcohol, and if they choose Heavy drinkerHeavy drinker they get a penalty if they don't visit a bar once a week. If they choose cleanclean, they might itch if they don't wear nice things, incurring a series of distracting messages, and the same could be happen for a character that chose dirty and wore Starchedstarched shirts. I would tend to implement it as penalty avoidance rather than bonus acquisition. However if nice clothes cost money, there is a difficulty in balancing that cost against some reward. The usual death of these things is some clearly advantageous combination at which point everyone is wearing a farmer's hat, wizard robes and metal gauntlets. (or drinking in one particular bar only between levels 9 and 10...

If you have a multi-axis reputation system where NPC's have affinity for similar PC's, signs of items worn by the character, or actions performed could play into that. The drunk at the bar could take issue with a sober character sitting there too long, or the Nobel Lady could shun those who are wearing battered armor and rags, but talk to those who are in silks or well maintained matching armor. Beggars might ignore or beg... etc. However if these things become gateways to quests or such then they take on an entirely different aspect. One way around that is to have a hidden latency on the effect. Characters dressed in silks all the time that don rags, don't fool the beggars, until they've been wearing them for some time. (a disguise skill could mediate how fast that transition takes place in that case)

You could also have the character determine at creation time what demeanor they will have... if they choose Sober, they are easily incapacitated by alcohol, and if they choose Heavy drinker they get a penalty if they don't visit a bar once a week. If they choose clean, they might itch if they don't wear nice things, incurring a series of distracting messages, and the same could be happen for a character that chose dirty and wore Starched shirts. I would tend to implement it as penalty avoidance rather than bonus acquisition. However if nice clothes cost money, there is a difficulty in balancing that cost against some reward. The usual death of these things is some clearly advantageous combination at which point everyone is wearing a farmer's hat, wizard robes and metal gauntlets. (or drinking in one particular bar only between levels 9 and 10...

If you have a multi-axis reputation system where NPC's have affinity for similar PC's, then signs of items worn by the character or actions performed could play into that. The drunk at the bar could take issue with a sober character sitting there too long, or the Noble Lady could shun those who are wearing battered armor and rags, but talk to those who are in silks or well maintained matching armor. Beggars might ignore or beg... etc. However if these things become gateways to quests or such then they take on an entirely different aspect. One way around that is to have a hidden latency on the effect; characters usually dressed in silks that don rags don't fool the beggars until they've been wearing them for some time. (A disguise skill could mediate how fast the transition takes place in that case)

You could also have the player determine at creation time what demeanor the character has; if they choose Sober, they are easily incapacitated by alcohol, and if they choose Heavy drinker they get a penalty if they don't visit a bar once a week. If they choose clean, they might itch if they don't wear nice things, incurring a series of distracting messages, and the same could be happen for a character that chose dirty and wore starched shirts. I would tend to implement it as penalty avoidance rather than bonus acquisition. However if nice clothes cost money, there is a difficulty in balancing that cost against some reward. The usual death of these things is some clearly advantageous combination at which point everyone is wearing a farmer's hat, wizard robes and metal gauntlets. (or drinking in one particular bar only between levels 9 and 10...

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If you have a multi-axis reputation system where NPC's have affinity for similar PC's, signs of items worn by the character, or actions performed could play into that. The drunk at the bar could take issue with a sober character sitting there too long, or the Nobel Lady could shun those who are wearing battered armor and rags, but talk to those who are in silks or well maintained matching armor. Beggars might ignore or beg... etc. However if these things become gateways to quests or such then they take on an entirely different aspect. One way around that is to have a hidden latency on the effect. Characters dressed in silks all the time that don rags, don't fool the beggars, until they've been wearing them for some time. (a disguise skill could mediate how fast that transition takes place in that case)

You could also have the character determine at creation time what demeanor they will have... if they choose Sober, they are easily incapacitated by alcohol, and if they choose Heavy drinker they get a penalty if they don't visit a bar once a week. If they choose clean, they might itch if they don't wear nice things, incurring a series of distracting messages, and the same could be happen for a character that chose dirty and wore Starched shirts. I would tend to implement it as penalty avoidance rather than bonus acquisition. However if nice clothes cost money, there is a difficulty in balancing that cost against some reward. The usual death of these things is some clearly advantageous combination at which point everyone is wearing a farmer's hat, wizard robes and metal gauntlets. (or drinking in one particular bar only between levels 9 and 10...