3 deleted 88 characters in body
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It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again. ames are usually given to you by people who knows you. The NPC can love it or hate it.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nicknames are given by friends or contacts.

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.

It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again. ames are usually given to you by people who knows you. The NPC can love it or hate it.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nicknames are given by friends or contacts.

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.

It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nicknames are given by friends or contacts.

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.

2 added 38 characters in body
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It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again. ames are usually given to you by people who knows you. The NPC can love it or hate it.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nicknnicknames are given by friends or contacts.

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.

It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again. ames are usually given to you by people who knows you. The NPC can love it or hate it.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nickn

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.

It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again. ames are usually given to you by people who knows you. The NPC can love it or hate it.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nicknames are given by friends or contacts.

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.

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It's fairly easy with some practice to create really interesting NPC. I use 5 steps:

  1. Find a problem and explain why it is a problem. Everybody has a problem or would like to change something in their lives. Examples are: My only daughter is in love with an idiot, I need more money for building the well. Why is your only daughter in love with an idiot a problem? Why do you need the well? It gives them motivation.
  2. Create a secret. We all have secrets. Some are more relevant than others. A secret linked to a problem gives a certain dimension. I need my daugher to marry the blacksmith's son because I could use an in-law with skills like him. I don't really care about the water in the well, I actually want to build a secret evasion tunnel in case the dragon attack again. ames are usually given to you by people who knows you. The NPC can love it or hate it.
  3. Give him a past. Everyone has a past. You don't have to write an entire biography and give them full family tree. The past should lead to the secret, problem or nickname. I am called the Lender because I have plenty of money from my early years as an adventurer until I lost my leg to a fight with a Nightmare. Now I lend money to new adventurers.
  4. Contacts. Nobody is truly alone and isolated. Find him a friend, a sibling or a mentor. He doesn't have to be fully described yet but just think about who this NPC would know well.
  5. Give him a nickname Most players won't remember an NPC's full complex name. Just focus on a nice nickname and give them any random first and last name and you'll notice players will only remember the nickname. Snake, Deepman, Fox, Hunterboy etc. Don't forget that nickn

I actually like rolling 1d6 for the four first steps. 1 being minimal and 6 being a really big thing. So an NPC like this: Problem 4, Secret 2, Past 5 and Contacts 3 could be someone with a big problem, a small secret a troubling past and be in contact with an average amount of people.

I just find it interesting, not necessarily useful for everybody.