4 retool intro to fit changes in the question
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Yes, yes it will.

I do have experience with BFRPG. It's is a very tidy clone of Basic D&D with some nice mechanical bitsheritage from d20, but it's still very much BD&D at its core. (I have experience with that too.) Judging what feel and style of campaign you're going for by your question and comments, giving full XP for gold will level them too fast for your taste:

Yes, yes it will.

I do have experience with BFRPG. It's a very tidy clone of Basic D&D with some nice mechanical bits from d20, but it's still very much BD&D at its core. (I have experience with that too.) Judging what feel and style of campaign you're going for by your question and comments, giving full XP for gold will level them too fast:

BFRPG is a very tidy clone of Basic D&D with some mechanical heritage from d20, but it's still very much BD&D at its core. Judging what feel and style of campaign you're going for by your question and comments, giving full XP for gold will level them too fast for your taste:

3 finally fix that one apostrophe now that the Q has been bumped for something meaningful
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It sounds like using an optional rule has been compounded by a module that had treasure far in excess of what is normal in a BFRPG campaign. And it sounds as if the damage is already done – your players have had their sense of the "right" amount of treasure calibrated for the entirely wrong amount, and their characters are overflowing with gold and high-quality gear. The gear and potions aren't a real problem – d20 players assume gear matters, but it only matters a very little in BFRPG because the system is less swingy around gear – the real problem is that the players have set this as their new baseline and will expect their PCsPCs' quality of living to be maintained at this new level.

It sounds like using an optional rule has been compounded by a module that had treasure far in excess of what is normal in a BFRPG campaign. And it sounds as if the damage is already done – your players have had their sense of the "right" amount of treasure calibrated for the entirely wrong amount, and their characters are overflowing with gold and high-quality gear. The gear and potions aren't a real problem – d20 players assume gear matters, but it only matters a very little in BFRPG because the system is less swingy around gear – the real problem is that the players have set this as their new baseline and will expect their PCs quality of living to be maintained at this new level.

It sounds like using an optional rule has been compounded by a module that had treasure far in excess of what is normal in a BFRPG campaign. And it sounds as if the damage is already done – your players have had their sense of the "right" amount of treasure calibrated for the entirely wrong amount, and their characters are overflowing with gold and high-quality gear. The gear and potions aren't a real problem – d20 players assume gear matters, but it only matters a very little in BFRPG because the system is less swingy around gear – the real problem is that the players have set this as their new baseline and will expect their PCs' quality of living to be maintained at this new level.

2 added 16 characters in body
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A player must always be wondering if they missed something, else they'll start treating it as a computer game that they need to get 100% completion on, and less like a scary, living world full of threats that they need to carefully judge and weigh the worth of facing. A player that knows you won't let them miss treasure is a player that is resting comfortably on a pillow, and they won't be able to take the risks to their characters seriously. Entitlement is the death of many a game. Make them earn their treasure, and they will become cunning, careful, and clever investigators of the world. Give them even the slightest hint that you're handing them easy victories and they'll stop trying so hard, be less entertaining to DM for, and simply become careless with how they interact with the game world. And then when they (or a retainer) die to a trap they should have learned the habits to avoid three levels ago, they'll blame you. In a way, they'll be right.

A player must always be wondering if they missed something, else they'll start treating it as a computer game that they need to get 100% completion on, and less like a scary, living world full of threats that they need to carefully judge and weigh the worth of facing. A player that knows you won't let them miss treasure is a player that is resting comfortably on a pillow, and they won't be able to take the risks to their characters seriously. Entitlement is the death of many a game. Make them earn their treasure, and they will become cunning, careful, and clever investigators of the world. Give them even the slightest hint that you're handing them easy victories and they'll stop trying so hard, be less entertaining to DM for, and simply become careless with how they interact with the game world. And then when they die to a trap they should have learned the habits to avoid three levels ago, they'll blame you. In a way, they'll be right.

A player must always be wondering if they missed something, else they'll start treating it as a computer game that they need to get 100% completion on, and less like a scary, living world full of threats that they need to carefully judge and weigh the worth of facing. A player that knows you won't let them miss treasure is a player that is resting comfortably on a pillow, and they won't be able to take the risks to their characters seriously. Entitlement is the death of many a game. Make them earn their treasure, and they will become cunning, careful, and clever investigators of the world. Give them even the slightest hint that you're handing them easy victories and they'll stop trying so hard, be less entertaining to DM for, and simply become careless with how they interact with the game world. And then when they (or a retainer) die to a trap they should have learned the habits to avoid three levels ago, they'll blame you. In a way, they'll be right.

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