2 Forgot conclusion.
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Something I would like to add:

Document layout

Books usually come in a 2-columned, A4 or letter format with a lot of pictures, text boxes and a fancy background. Sometimes all of this has a poor contrast even as a real book (mostly due to the fancy backgrounds).

An e-book has to work for different screen sizes and at best populates pages dynamically (no need to scroll) while keeping boxes and pictures from braking the reading flow too much and displaying them correctly.

Sadly, nearly all RPG-related digital material I have ever seen is either

  • Poorly translated to a native e-book format, e.g.:

    • Boxes are several pages long, begin mid-sentence and are hard to identify as special text.
    • Pictures clutter at the end of the document and are of poor quality.
    • It is impossible to differentiate section, subsection and paragraph headings.
    • Tables look horrible or do not work at all.
    • Non-ASCII characters do not work.

    Part of this might be due to the fact that there seems to be no standard on how e-books should be displayed (or there is one, but nobody adheres to it).

  • Simple PDF copies of the books: Since for most readers, full-page view is not feasible, this means that you have to scroll a lot for the usual multi-column layout and even more so for pictures and boxes, because you have to guess where the sentence continues. If your reader can only support gray scale or just black and white, identifying pictures or even reading the text at all (fancy background, shading of boxes etc.) might be painful or downright impossible.

I work a lot with lecture-scripts or scientific papers digitally – annotating, bookmarking, crossreferencing etc. (And even scribble lecture notes or doodle on my tablet-pc with a digitizer-pen or graphics tablet.) But I always end up printing the stuff I need to frequently work with because hardly any papers or scripts are formatted in a way that makes it painless to work with them digitally (for about the same reasons as I stated above for RPG-material).

Formatting of digital media (other than webpages) mostly still follows the principles that have been established over centuries to give the best reading experience in print media.

Which (among what has been stated in other answers) is one of the most important aspects, why I usually prefer the book to the digital version with the same content – usually the content was written and/or formatted with a book in mind, not an e-book.

Something I would like to add:

Document layout

Books usually come in a 2-columned, A4 or letter format with a lot of pictures, text boxes and a fancy background. Sometimes all of this has a poor contrast even as a real book (mostly due to the fancy backgrounds).

An e-book has to work for different screen sizes and at best populates pages dynamically (no need to scroll) while keeping boxes and pictures from braking the reading flow too much and displaying them correctly.

Sadly, nearly all RPG-related digital material I have ever seen is either

  • Poorly translated to a native e-book format, e.g.:

    • Boxes are several pages long, begin mid-sentence and are hard to identify as special text.
    • Pictures clutter at the end of the document and are of poor quality.
    • It is impossible to differentiate section, subsection and paragraph headings.
    • Tables look horrible or do not work at all.
    • Non-ASCII characters do not work.

    Part of this might be due to the fact that there seems to be no standard on how e-books should be displayed (or there is one, but nobody adheres to it).

  • Simple PDF copies of the books: Since for most readers, full-page view is not feasible, this means that you have to scroll a lot for the usual multi-column layout and even more so for pictures and boxes, because you have to guess where the sentence continues. If your reader can only support gray scale or just black and white, identifying pictures or even reading the text at all (fancy background, shading of boxes etc.) might be painful or downright impossible.

I work a lot with lecture-scripts or scientific papers digitally – annotating, bookmarking, crossreferencing etc. (And even scribble lecture notes or doodle on my tablet-pc with a digitizer-pen or graphics tablet.) But I always end up printing the stuff I need to frequently work with because hardly any papers or scripts are formatted in a way that makes it painless to work with them digitally (for about the same reasons as I stated above for RPG-material).

Formatting of digital media (other than webpages) mostly still follows the principles that have been established over centuries to give the best reading experience in print media.

Something I would like to add:

Document layout

Books usually come in a 2-columned, A4 or letter format with a lot of pictures, text boxes and a fancy background. Sometimes all of this has a poor contrast even as a real book (mostly due to the fancy backgrounds).

An e-book has to work for different screen sizes and at best populates pages dynamically (no need to scroll) while keeping boxes and pictures from braking the reading flow too much and displaying them correctly.

Sadly, nearly all RPG-related digital material I have ever seen is either

  • Poorly translated to a native e-book format, e.g.:

    • Boxes are several pages long, begin mid-sentence and are hard to identify as special text.
    • Pictures clutter at the end of the document and are of poor quality.
    • It is impossible to differentiate section, subsection and paragraph headings.
    • Tables look horrible or do not work at all.
    • Non-ASCII characters do not work.

    Part of this might be due to the fact that there seems to be no standard on how e-books should be displayed (or there is one, but nobody adheres to it).

  • Simple PDF copies of the books: Since for most readers, full-page view is not feasible, this means that you have to scroll a lot for the usual multi-column layout and even more so for pictures and boxes, because you have to guess where the sentence continues. If your reader can only support gray scale or just black and white, identifying pictures or even reading the text at all (fancy background, shading of boxes etc.) might be painful or downright impossible.

I work a lot with lecture-scripts or scientific papers digitally – annotating, bookmarking, crossreferencing etc. (And even scribble lecture notes or doodle on my tablet-pc with a digitizer-pen or graphics tablet.) But I always end up printing the stuff I need to frequently work with because hardly any papers or scripts are formatted in a way that makes it painless to work with them digitally (for about the same reasons as I stated above for RPG-material).

Formatting of digital media (other than webpages) mostly still follows the principles that have been established over centuries to give the best reading experience in print media.

Which (among what has been stated in other answers) is one of the most important aspects, why I usually prefer the book to the digital version with the same content – usually the content was written and/or formatted with a book in mind, not an e-book.

1
source | link

Something I would like to add:

Document layout

Books usually come in a 2-columned, A4 or letter format with a lot of pictures, text boxes and a fancy background. Sometimes all of this has a poor contrast even as a real book (mostly due to the fancy backgrounds).

An e-book has to work for different screen sizes and at best populates pages dynamically (no need to scroll) while keeping boxes and pictures from braking the reading flow too much and displaying them correctly.

Sadly, nearly all RPG-related digital material I have ever seen is either

  • Poorly translated to a native e-book format, e.g.:

    • Boxes are several pages long, begin mid-sentence and are hard to identify as special text.
    • Pictures clutter at the end of the document and are of poor quality.
    • It is impossible to differentiate section, subsection and paragraph headings.
    • Tables look horrible or do not work at all.
    • Non-ASCII characters do not work.

    Part of this might be due to the fact that there seems to be no standard on how e-books should be displayed (or there is one, but nobody adheres to it).

  • Simple PDF copies of the books: Since for most readers, full-page view is not feasible, this means that you have to scroll a lot for the usual multi-column layout and even more so for pictures and boxes, because you have to guess where the sentence continues. If your reader can only support gray scale or just black and white, identifying pictures or even reading the text at all (fancy background, shading of boxes etc.) might be painful or downright impossible.

I work a lot with lecture-scripts or scientific papers digitally – annotating, bookmarking, crossreferencing etc. (And even scribble lecture notes or doodle on my tablet-pc with a digitizer-pen or graphics tablet.) But I always end up printing the stuff I need to frequently work with because hardly any papers or scripts are formatted in a way that makes it painless to work with them digitally (for about the same reasons as I stated above for RPG-material).

Formatting of digital media (other than webpages) mostly still follows the principles that have been established over centuries to give the best reading experience in print media.