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Different Aesthetics of Play

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of FunThe Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The great thing about the article is that it provides a framework for discussing styles of gaming and playing that gives inherent value to everyone's preferred method of "fun." As a primarily Expression-seeking player myself, I've played a few oddball characters in my time, and I'd take exception to being accused of not caring about "immersion". I'm as immersed in my off-the-wall characters as I am with my serious ones. I would have an easier time conceding that some of those characters wouldn't fit in every campaign I've ever played, and that if I tried to play my sorcerer-cursed-with-the-body-of-a-gnat in a serious intrigue campaign I'd probably be spoiling the suspension of disbelief some of my Fantasy-seeking companions crave from that particular campaign.

You mention in the comments of another answer that you have a group of roughly 17 people as potential players for any given campaign. In a group that large you're bound to have conflicting Aesthetics of Play among the many players. Rather than forcing everyone to conform to the same Fantasy-heavy style that seems to be the majority Aesthetic, you have an opportunity to branch out and experiment with different modes of role-playing.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The great thing about the article is that it provides a framework for discussing styles of gaming and playing that gives inherent value to everyone's preferred method of "fun." As a primarily Expression-seeking player myself, I've played a few oddball characters in my time, and I'd take exception to being accused of not caring about "immersion". I'm as immersed in my off-the-wall characters as I am with my serious ones. I would have an easier time conceding that some of those characters wouldn't fit in every campaign I've ever played, and that if I tried to play my sorcerer-cursed-with-the-body-of-a-gnat in a serious intrigue campaign I'd probably be spoiling the suspension of disbelief some of my Fantasy-seeking companions crave from that particular campaign.

You mention in the comments of another answer that you have a group of roughly 17 people as potential players for any given campaign. In a group that large you're bound to have conflicting Aesthetics of Play among the many players. Rather than forcing everyone to conform to the same Fantasy-heavy style that seems to be the majority Aesthetic, you have an opportunity to branch out and experiment with different modes of role-playing.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The great thing about the article is that it provides a framework for discussing styles of gaming and playing that gives inherent value to everyone's preferred method of "fun." As a primarily Expression-seeking player myself, I've played a few oddball characters in my time, and I'd take exception to being accused of not caring about "immersion". I'm as immersed in my off-the-wall characters as I am with my serious ones. I would have an easier time conceding that some of those characters wouldn't fit in every campaign I've ever played, and that if I tried to play my sorcerer-cursed-with-the-body-of-a-gnat in a serious intrigue campaign I'd probably be spoiling the suspension of disbelief some of my Fantasy-seeking companions crave from that particular campaign.

You mention in the comments of another answer that you have a group of roughly 17 people as potential players for any given campaign. In a group that large you're bound to have conflicting Aesthetics of Play among the many players. Rather than forcing everyone to conform to the same Fantasy-heavy style that seems to be the majority Aesthetic, you have an opportunity to branch out and experiment with different modes of role-playing.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

3 Fixed some errors in language that confused the answer; added explanatory paragraph on using aesthetics as frameworks for discussion
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Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The great thing about the article is that it provides a framework for discussing styles of gaming and playing that gives inherent value to everyone's preferred method of "fun." As a primarily Expression-seeking player myself, I've played a few oddball characters in my time, and I'd take exception to being accused of not caring about "immersion". I'm as immersed in my off-the-wall characters as I am with my serious ones. I would have an easier time conceding that some of those characters wouldn't fit in every campaign I've ever played, and that if I tried to play my sorcerer-cursed-with-the-body-of-a-gnat in a serious intrigue campaign I'd probably be spoiling the suspension of disbelief some of my Fantasy-seeking companions crave from that particular campaign.

You mention in the comments of another answer that you have a group of roughly 17 people as potential players for any given campaign. In a group that large you're bound to have conflicting Aesthetics of Play among the many players. Rather than forcing everyone to conform to the same Fantasy-heavy style that seems to be the majority Aesthetic, you have an opportunity to branch out and experiment with different modes of role-playing.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The great thing about the article is that it provides a framework for discussing styles of gaming and playing that gives inherent value to everyone's preferred method of "fun." As a primarily Expression-seeking player myself, I've played a few oddball characters in my time, and I'd take exception to being accused of not caring about "immersion". I'm as immersed in my off-the-wall characters as I am with my serious ones. I would have an easier time conceding that some of those characters wouldn't fit in every campaign I've ever played, and that if I tried to play my sorcerer-cursed-with-the-body-of-a-gnat in a serious intrigue campaign I'd probably be spoiling the suspension of disbelief some of my Fantasy-seeking companions crave from that particular campaign.

You mention in the comments of another answer that you have a group of roughly 17 people as potential players for any given campaign. In a group that large you're bound to have conflicting Aesthetics of Play among the many players. Rather than forcing everyone to conform to the same Fantasy-heavy style that seems to be the majority Aesthetic, you have an opportunity to branch out and experiment with different modes of role-playing.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

2 added 12 characters in body
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Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's FantasyExpression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaberativecollaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a campaign tailored to your group's Fantasy-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaberative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

Different Aesthetics of Play

The trick here is to understand that these are not necessarily "problem players" (the one who badgers GMs until they cave is definitely exhibiting problematic behavior though); the problem is that are looking for different things from your games than the rest of the group is trying to get. Refer to The Eight Kinds of Fun where the Aesthetics of Play are discussed as they relate to Tabletop Roleplaying. The article even points out the exact problem you describe; Expression-seeking oddballs upsetting the ability of Fantasy-seekers to get what they want out of the campaign.

The best solution; especially with what appears to be a massive stable of players, is to create a separate campaign tailored to your group's Expression-seekers. Draft a GM and some additional players who seem the most game and oddball the hell out of it. Try to run a system involving collaborative storytelling's and shared world building and your Expression-seekers will be even more satisfied.

Treat the situation less like it's a problem with the way they play and more like the campaigns were some kind of Reese's experiment that doesn't work for everyone. Keep your Fantasy-chocolate and Expression-peanut-butter separate and everyone should be happy.

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