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Establish a roll-table (RNG table)

For all the skill check that can lead to such metagame concern, when I think the players will bother me with that kind of behavior, I write down their skills value. Then, I roll (or make them roll) about 10-20 rolls and make an array with these values.

Each time there is a situation where they should roll dice, use a value of the table instead, they won't even hear dice rolling and won't suspect anything.

When it concern an active test (they say they search the room), I don't make them roll a dice if they have all their time, and just consider the dice roll an average value (modified by how they describe their action)

The table method is really useful for 'passive' checks, and even active one when time matters. Also, I find it really good for the players because they (as players, not their character) really don't know how successful was their character, therefore, they won't involuntarily change their behavior depending on how good was the roll. You can't still make them feel that they failed or succeeded in a particular way by describing in a suitable way how they act/perceive their environment (giving more or less details, focusing on a useful/useless point...)

Make the roll first, describe everything after

You can also, when entering a place, ask a roll before all. Then adapt your description depending on the results, telling them that it's all they find in the room. Most of the time, this imply a change in how you use the rules and players should be warned before (explain them you are trying something new to improve the game experience). Still, this does not totally prevent the behavior you are talking about.

Above all

After/before a game session, talk with them about their vision of the game mechanics, talk them into trying to make things more immersive and experiment new rules.

Establish a roll-table (RNG table)

For all the skill check that can lead to such metagame concern, when I think the players will bother me with that kind of behavior, I write down their skills value. Then, I roll (or make them roll) about 10-20 rolls and make an array with these values.

Each time there is a situation where they should roll dice, use a value of the table instead, they won't even hear dice rolling and won't suspect anything.

When it concern an active test (they say they search the room), I don't make them roll a dice if they have all their time, and just consider the dice roll an average value (modified by how they describe their action)

The table method is really useful for 'passive' checks, and even active one when time matters. Also, I find it really good for the players because they (as players, not their character) really don't know how successful was their character, therefore, they won't involuntarily change their behavior depending on how good was the roll. You can't still make them feel that they failed or succeeded in a particular way by describing in a suitable way how they act/perceive their environment (giving more or less details, focusing on a useful/useless point...)

Establish a roll-table (RNG table)

For all the skill check that can lead to such metagame concern, when I think the players will bother me with that kind of behavior, I write down their skills value. Then, I roll (or make them roll) about 10-20 rolls and make an array with these values.

Each time there is a situation where they should roll dice, use a value of the table instead, they won't even hear dice rolling and won't suspect anything.

When it concern an active test (they say they search the room), I don't make them roll a dice if they have all their time, and just consider the dice roll an average value (modified by how they describe their action)

The table method is really useful for 'passive' checks, and even active one when time matters. Also, I find it really good for the players because they (as players, not their character) really don't know how successful was their character, therefore, they won't involuntarily change their behavior depending on how good was the roll. You can't still make them feel that they failed or succeeded in a particular way by describing in a suitable way how they act/perceive their environment (giving more or less details, focusing on a useful/useless point...)

Make the roll first, describe everything after

You can also, when entering a place, ask a roll before all. Then adapt your description depending on the results, telling them that it's all they find in the room. Most of the time, this imply a change in how you use the rules and players should be warned before (explain them you are trying something new to improve the game experience). Still, this does not totally prevent the behavior you are talking about.

Above all

After/before a game session, talk with them about their vision of the game mechanics, talk them into trying to make things more immersive and experiment new rules.

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source | link

Establish a roll-table (RNG table)

For all the skill check that can lead to such metagame concern, when I think the players will bother me with that kind of behavior, I write down their skills value. Then, I roll (or make them roll) about 10-20 rolls and make an array with these values.

Each time there is a situation where they should roll dice, use a value of the table instead, they won't even hear dice rolling and won't suspect anything.

When it concern an active test (they say they search the room), I don't make them roll a dice if they have all their time, and just consider the dice roll an average value (modified by how they describe their action)

The table method is really useful for 'passive' checks, and even active one when time matters. Also, I find it really good for the players because they (as players, not their character) really don't know how successful was their character, therefore, they won't involuntarily change their behavior depending on how good was the roll. You can't still make them feel that they failed or succeeded in a particular way by describing in a suitable way how they act/perceive their environment (giving more or less details, focusing on a useful/useless point...)