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Im going to take a different approach to answering this question.

The following information helps both the Players and the GM. My answer draws alot of influence from the murder mystery genre but will help to other kind of investigation plots.

Suggest good sources of influence for the GM.Suggest good sources of influence for the GM. There are a number of TV series, Films, and Novels that can help. In effect, being more genre savvy helps.

The number of players.The number of players. The more you have, the harder it comes for the GM. The difficulty of running an investigation increases dramatically with the number of players.

Moment to shine.The PC's Moment to shine. Look at each of the specific classes and their class features. A better understanding of the spell lists helps. Engineer situations where specific class features could help.

Abductive Reasoning.Use of Reasoning. The signature method of deduction by Sherlock Holmes was abductive reasoning. A better understanding of logic (deductive, inductive, and abductive) will help both the GM and Players when it comes to building and discovering plots. This is often explored in murder mysteries. Sherlock holmes would painstakingly examine crime scenes.

Psychology.Psychology. An decent understanding of the topic would help one build psychologically compelling characters as well as create mysteries where understanding the NPC's personalities is key to discovering the conspiracy. This is often explored by Agatha Christie.

Mastery of Suspence.Mastery of Suspence. Being genre savvy will help the GM build up suspence, as well as maintain it right till the end. Alfred Hitchcock is nicknamed the master of suspence. "He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres." - wikipedia.

Getting people to talkGetting people to talk. Both of these can be a point of fun for the players. This is exemplified by Hercule Poirot.

In later works, Christie made a point of having Poirot supply false or misleading information about himself or his background to assist him in obtaining information.

Poirot establishes his psychological bona fides. Rather than painstakingly examining crime scenes, he inquires into the nature of the victim or the psychology of the murderer. - wikipedia

Both of these can be a point of fun for the players.

Look into the various detectives in the genre.Look into the various detectives in the genre. Look at the specific methods that they used. This would help the players build more compelling characters. An example would be Miss Marple, who was a little old lady who would casually listen to conversations between other people. The villains would not suspect her as the investigator to be wary off until it is too late.

Im going to take a different approach to answering this question.

The following information helps both the Players and the GM. My answer draws alot of influence from the murder mystery genre but will help to other kind of investigation plots.

Suggest good sources of influence for the GM. There are a number of TV series, Films, and Novels that can help. In effect, being more genre savvy helps.

The number of players. The more you have, the harder it comes for the GM. The difficulty of running an investigation increases dramatically with the number of players.

Moment to shine. Look at each of the specific classes and their class features. A better understanding of the spell lists helps. Engineer situations where specific class features could help.

Abductive Reasoning. The signature method of deduction by Sherlock Holmes. A better understanding of logic (deductive, inductive, and abductive) will help both the GM and Players when it comes to building and discovering plots. This is often explored in murder mysteries. Sherlock holmes would painstakingly examine crime scenes.

Psychology. An decent understanding of the topic would help one build psychologically compelling characters as well as create mysteries where understanding the NPC's personalities is key to discovering the conspiracy. This is often explored by Agatha Christie.

Mastery of Suspence. Being genre savvy will help the GM build up suspence, as well as maintain it right till the end. Alfred Hitchcock is nicknamed the master of suspence. "He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres." - wikipedia.

Getting people to talk. This is exemplified by Hercule Poirot.

In later works, Christie made a point of having Poirot supply false or misleading information about himself or his background to assist him in obtaining information.

Poirot establishes his psychological bona fides. Rather than painstakingly examining crime scenes, he inquires into the nature of the victim or the psychology of the murderer. - wikipedia

Both of these can be a point of fun for the players.

Look into the various detectives in the genre. Look at the specific methods that they used. This would help the players build more compelling characters. An example would be Miss Marple, who was a little old lady who would casually listen to conversations between other people. The villains would not suspect her as the investigator to be wary off until it is too late.

Im going to take a different approach to answering this question.

The following information helps both the Players and the GM. My answer draws alot of influence from the murder mystery genre but will help to other kind of investigation plots.

Suggest good sources of influence for the GM. There are a number of TV series, Films, and Novels that can help. In effect, being more genre savvy helps.

The number of players. The more you have, the harder it comes for the GM. The difficulty of running an investigation increases dramatically with the number of players.

The PC's Moment to shine. Look at each of the specific classes and their class features. A better understanding of the spell lists helps. Engineer situations where specific class features could help.

Use of Reasoning. The signature method of deduction by Sherlock Holmes was abductive reasoning. A better understanding of logic (deductive, inductive, and abductive) will help both the GM and Players when it comes to building and discovering plots. This is often explored in murder mysteries. Sherlock holmes would painstakingly examine crime scenes.

Psychology. An decent understanding of the topic would help one build psychologically compelling characters as well as create mysteries where understanding the NPC's personalities is key to discovering the conspiracy. This is often explored by Agatha Christie.

Mastery of Suspence. Being genre savvy will help the GM build up suspence, as well as maintain it right till the end. Alfred Hitchcock is nicknamed the master of suspence. "He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres." - wikipedia.

Getting people to talk. Both of these can be a point of fun for the players. This is exemplified by Hercule Poirot.

In later works, Christie made a point of having Poirot supply false or misleading information about himself or his background to assist him in obtaining information.

Poirot establishes his psychological bona fides. Rather than painstakingly examining crime scenes, he inquires into the nature of the victim or the psychology of the murderer. - wikipedia

Look into the various detectives in the genre. Look at the specific methods that they used. This would help the players build more compelling characters. An example would be Miss Marple, who was a little old lady who would casually listen to conversations between other people. The villains would not suspect her as the investigator to be wary off until it is too late.

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source | link

Im going to take a different approach to answering this question.

The following information helps both the Players and the GM. My answer draws alot of influence from the murder mystery genre but will help to other kind of investigation plots.

Suggest good sources of influence for the GM. There are a number of TV series, Films, and Novels that can help. In effect, being more genre savvy helps.

The number of players. The more you have, the harder it comes for the GM. The difficulty of running an investigation increases dramatically with the number of players.

Moment to shine. Look at each of the specific classes and their class features. A better understanding of the spell lists helps. Engineer situations where specific class features could help.

Abductive Reasoning. The signature method of deduction by Sherlock Holmes. A better understanding of logic (deductive, inductive, and abductive) will help both the GM and Players when it comes to building and discovering plots. This is often explored in murder mysteries. Sherlock holmes would painstakingly examine crime scenes.

Psychology. An decent understanding of the topic would help one build psychologically compelling characters as well as create mysteries where understanding the NPC's personalities is key to discovering the conspiracy. This is often explored by Agatha Christie.

Mastery of Suspence. Being genre savvy will help the GM build up suspence, as well as maintain it right till the end. Alfred Hitchcock is nicknamed the master of suspence. "He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres." - wikipedia.

Getting people to talk. This is exemplified by Hercule Poirot.

In later works, Christie made a point of having Poirot supply false or misleading information about himself or his background to assist him in obtaining information.

Poirot establishes his psychological bona fides. Rather than painstakingly examining crime scenes, he inquires into the nature of the victim or the psychology of the murderer. - wikipedia

Both of these can be a point of fun for the players.

Look into the various detectives in the genre. Look at the specific methods that they used. This would help the players build more compelling characters. An example would be Miss Marple, who was a little old lady who would casually listen to conversations between other people. The villains would not suspect her as the investigator to be wary off until it is too late.