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Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.

However, assuming sufficient digging capabilities, and people willing to defend the exterior, a WWII trench shelter is not a bad plan. The trick is that it's fundamentally immobilising and rather depends on others to keep the character safe. FM7-10 does have tediously exhaustive instructions for building one: enter image description here

WWII Trench Shelter

A much better bet is to hire "night guards" as hirelings, whose job it is to set up the palisade and trench and stand guard overnight. This provides a much higher level of safety (no restricted mobility, no threat of drowning by rain or enemy action) with only a trivial outlay.

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.

However, assuming sufficient digging capabilities, and people willing to defend the exterior, a WWII trench shelter is not a bad plan. The trick is that it's fundamentally immobilising and rather depends on others to keep the character safe. FM7-10 does have tediously exhaustive instructions for building one: enter image description here

A much better bet is to hire "night guards" as hirelings, whose job it is to set up the palisade and trench and stand guard overnight. This provides a much higher level of safety (no restricted mobility, no threat of drowning by rain or enemy action) with only a trivial outlay.

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.

However, assuming sufficient digging capabilities, and people willing to defend the exterior, a WWII trench shelter is not a bad plan. The trick is that it's fundamentally immobilising and rather depends on others to keep the character safe. FM7-10 does have tediously exhaustive instructions for building one:

WWII Trench Shelter

A much better bet is to hire "night guards" as hirelings, whose job it is to set up the palisade and trench and stand guard overnight. This provides a much higher level of safety (no restricted mobility, no threat of drowning by rain or enemy action) with only a trivial outlay.

2 added 750 characters in body
source | link

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.

However, assuming sufficient digging capabilities, and people willing to defend the exterior, a WWII trench shelter is not a bad plan. The trick is that it's fundamentally immobilising and rather depends on others to keep the character safe. FM7-10 does have tediously exhaustive instructions for building one: enter image description here

A much better bet is to hire "night guards" as hirelings, whose job it is to set up the palisade and trench and stand guard overnight. This provides a much higher level of safety (no restricted mobility, no threat of drowning by rain or enemy action) with only a trivial outlay.

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.

However, assuming sufficient digging capabilities, and people willing to defend the exterior, a WWII trench shelter is not a bad plan. The trick is that it's fundamentally immobilising and rather depends on others to keep the character safe. FM7-10 does have tediously exhaustive instructions for building one: enter image description here

A much better bet is to hire "night guards" as hirelings, whose job it is to set up the palisade and trench and stand guard overnight. This provides a much higher level of safety (no restricted mobility, no threat of drowning by rain or enemy action) with only a trivial outlay.

1
source | link

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly.

This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest.

Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans diagrams for the shelter that the whole party can fit in. Besides covering the party against stray fireballs, the very narrow entrances (you always want two in any kind of threatened area) will make it very easy to defend (assuming the enemy didn't bring shovels).

However, I suspect that this "bury yourself alive" stems from a naive view of defensive priorities. It's fairly straightforward to make a trench and palisade wall around the fire. While any proper route-camp fortification (in the roman style) will require proper watch-standers, the trench and wall will make a significant defensive difference.