3 added 1 character in body
source | link

You're trying to railroad the game. Stop that. The when the players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go instead. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

To run an interesting socially-focused game, you might need to learn how to use a few tools. Challenging situations made from social connections can be made using PC-NPC-PC triangles—but don't make life-or-death situations out of them unless you want a bloodbath; save life-and-death for external threats to the social group. In a game with a big stable of NPCs in a complex set of social relationships, maps of the land become far less important than maps of the social situation, and you can use relationship maps (like this one) to keep track of how everyone is connected and feels about each other.

  • Challenging situations made from social connections can be made using PC-NPC-PC triangles—but don't intentionally make life-or-death situations out of them unless you want a bloodbath; save life-and-death for external threats to the social group.

  • In a game with a big stable of NPCs in a complex set of social relationships, maps of the land become far less important than maps of the social situation, and you can use relationship maps (like this one) to keep track of how everyone is connected and feels about each other.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.

You're trying to railroad the game. Stop that. The players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

To run an interesting socially-focused game, you might need to learn how to use a few tools. Challenging situations made from social connections can be made using PC-NPC-PC triangles—but don't make life-or-death situations out of them unless you want a bloodbath; save life-and-death for external threats to the social group. In a game with a big stable of NPCs in a complex set of social relationships, maps of the land become far less important than maps of the social situation, and you can use relationship maps (like this one) to keep track of how everyone is connected and feels about each other.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.

You're trying to railroad the game when the players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go instead. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

To run an interesting socially-focused game, you might need to learn how to use a few tools.

  • Challenging situations made from social connections can be made using PC-NPC-PC triangles—but don't intentionally make life-or-death situations out of them unless you want a bloodbath; save life-and-death for external threats to the social group.

  • In a game with a big stable of NPCs in a complex set of social relationships, maps of the land become far less important than maps of the social situation, and you can use relationship maps (like this one) to keep track of how everyone is connected and feels about each other.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.

2 two tools: triangles and r-maps
source | link

You're trying to railroad the game. Stop that. The players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

To run an interesting socially-focused game, you might need to learn how to use a few tools. Challenging situations made from social connections can be made using PC-NPC-PC triangles—but don't make life-or-death situations out of them unless you want a bloodbath; save life-and-death for external threats to the social group. In a game with a big stable of NPCs in a complex set of social relationships, maps of the land become far less important than maps of the social situation, and you can use relationship maps (like this one) to keep track of how everyone is connected and feels about each other.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.

You're trying to railroad the game. Stop that. The players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.

You're trying to railroad the game. Stop that. The players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

To run an interesting socially-focused game, you might need to learn how to use a few tools. Challenging situations made from social connections can be made using PC-NPC-PC triangles—but don't make life-or-death situations out of them unless you want a bloodbath; save life-and-death for external threats to the social group. In a game with a big stable of NPCs in a complex set of social relationships, maps of the land become far less important than maps of the social situation, and you can use relationship maps (like this one) to keep track of how everyone is connected and feels about each other.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.

1
source | link

You're trying to railroad the game. Stop that. The players are telling you very loudly where they want the campaign to go. Take them there.

If the NPCs are boring you, that's a different problem. Be sure you're making NPCs that engage you and not just your players. You have to enjoy the game too.

And if, in the end, you don't want at all to play a game that is heavily focused on personal relationships and social interactions, sit down and talk with your players about what kind of game you can all enjoy. Putting a collar around their neck and dragging them toward the plot won't be fun for them or (as you've been learning) for you either.