Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
4 edit in link
source | link

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I sawa funny comic I saw. Aragorn was riding a warg that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. He wished to fall off the warg, to which the DM demanded an riding check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the warg", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the warg.

enter image description here

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. Aragorn was riding a warg that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. He wished to fall off the warg, to which the DM demanded an riding check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the warg", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the warg.

enter image description here

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. Aragorn was riding a warg that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. He wished to fall off the warg, to which the DM demanded an riding check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the warg", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the warg.

enter image description here

3 added 50 characters in body
source | link

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. A characterAragorn was riding a horsewarg that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. The player He wished to fall off the horsewarg, to which the DM demanded an animal handlingriding check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the horse"warg", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the horsewarg.

enter image description here

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. A character was riding a horse that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. The player wished to fall off the horse, to which the DM demanded an animal handling check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the horse", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the horse.

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. Aragorn was riding a warg that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. He wished to fall off the warg, to which the DM demanded an riding check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the warg", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the warg.

enter image description here

2 added 1589 characters in body
source | link

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. A character was riding a horse that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. The player wished to fall off the horse, to which the DM demanded an animal handling check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the horse", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the horse.

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when they wish the spell to effect them.

This is expressed in the wording of the rules:

A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat.

Emphasis mine. When one attempts to resist a spell a trap or something else, a saving throw is made. However, this attempt is not normally done as an action by the player. As the next line states:

You don't normally decide to make a saving throw, you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

Unlike most contests, and attacks, saving throws are not an active Action by the player. They are a response to an event, but that response is a representation of your characters decision to attempt to avoid the consequences.

This is the language that is mirrored at the begining of the section where it describes how to use ability scores in general:

Every task that a character or monster might attempt in the game is covered by one of the six abilities. This section explains in more detail what those abilities mean and the ways they are used in the game.

In general, if you are not attempting to do something, there is no need to roll.

The alternative, puts you in this strange rules space which reminds me of a funny comic I saw. A character was riding a horse that was out of control and was heading towards a cliff edge. The player wished to fall off the horse, to which the DM demanded an animal handling check. The Player rolled a 1, and "failed to fall off the horse", resulting in him falling off the cliff with the horse.

1
source | link