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There are 3 possibilities here. The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answerhis answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

Note that Jeremy Crawford, official source of rules interpretations, says that "no rule lets you opt to fail a save."

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

There are 3 possibilities here. The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

Note that Jeremy Crawford, official source of rules interpretations, says that "no rule lets you opt to fail a save."

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

There are 3 possibilities here. The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

Note that Jeremy Crawford, official source of rules interpretations, says that "no rule lets you opt to fail a save."

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

6 added 187 characters in body
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There are 3 possibilities here.The The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

Note that Jeremy Crawford, official source of rules interpretations, says that "no rule lets you opt to fail a save."

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

There are 3 possibilities here.The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

There are 3 possibilities here. The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

Note that Jeremy Crawford, official source of rules interpretations, says that "no rule lets you opt to fail a save."

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

5 added 280 characters in body
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There are 3 possibilities here.The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

There are 3 possibilities here.The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

There are 3 possibilities here.The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says:

You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm.

This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a saving throw would be choosing not to make one, effectively. The text says that you are forced to make one, however, so choosing not to does not seem possible.

The second possibility is that spell saving throws can be voluntarily failed (as opposed to saving throws in general.) The text on page 205 has:

Many spells specify that a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of the effects.

This is less clear due to the use of the word 'can', however it doesn't provide any explicit exceptions to the general rule, so I would assume that it is not meant provide a choice.

The third possibility is that only the spells which explicitly state that the player has a choice provide the player with a choice. Calm Emotions, a good example, has:

a creature can choose to fail this saving throw if it wishes.

The use of the word 'this' suggests that the choice provided applies specifically to the spell it appears in. This is the only explicit exception to the general rule provided. Therefore, I would conclude that this choice is only provided where it is specifically stated.

As wax eagle pointed out in his answer, many spells use the phrasing, 'the target must make a saving throw', which is entirely unambiguous if you accept that choosing to fail a saving throw is the same as choosing not to make one.

If you wanted to allow a player to fail a saving throw, that's up to you as the DM. It's worth pointing out, though, that some saving throws are, realistically, impossible to deliberately fail. You can't choose to have your body accept a disease or poison without fighting it. Likewise, it may not be possible to 'allow' yourself to be banished. Even some Dex saves may be involuntary - the body automatically flinches back from many things, like intense heat.

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