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I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group and it doesn't strictly answer the question, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR


TL;DR

By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load. Fighting smarter means resting less.

I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group and it doesn't strictly answer the question, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR


By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load. Fighting smarter means resting less.

I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group and it doesn't strictly answer the question, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR

By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load. Fighting smarter means resting less.

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I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group and it doesn't strictly answer the question, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR


By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load. Fighting smarter means resting less.

I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR


By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load.

I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group and it doesn't strictly answer the question, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR


By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load. Fighting smarter means resting less.

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I don't know if this answer will be pertinent to your group, but mine was once in a very similar situation and, as we learned to play the game (this was 2nd edition), we noticed that the problem eventually disappeared due to a slight change in our combat approach. We were somehow doing it "wrong", and it was entirely possible to survive encounters without spending all of our limited resources every fight without tweaking the rules.

It's not impossible that your players are bringing this upon themselves by trying to out-damage the opposition. If they can change their mindset and try to out-think the enemies instead, the fights will take only a few rounds longer (mere seconds or minutes), but they'll expend a lot less resources (which take hours to recuperate).

For instance, a wizard could be using a fireball to quickly deal with a group of goblins. This is common, yet mostly overkill. Indeed, goblins can commonly be one-shot by most melee or ranged attacks if you have decent stats (they have 7 hp). If you are getting swarmed by the goblins, however, using the fireball might be tempting, as they'll most likely all die. But you could also use sleep (a first level spell) or web (a second level spell) to take out a large number of enemies from the fight. This will allow your fighter and druid (the ones that are barely taking damage), to position themselves in a way that will force the remaining enemies to attack them, which will in turn allow your casters to keep their higher level spells for tougher enemies or more crucial fights. If the enemies ignore the front line and go after the casters, your melee characters' attack power will double, as they'll receive an additional attack for the round when the enemies leave their threat range, essentially doubling their attack power at low levels.

Spells like cloud of daggers, for instance, can be cast in a doorway to force every enemy that enters the room to take 4d4 slashing damage (no save!). When fighting low level enemies such as goblins, this mean that every creature that enters the room likely dies. That either means you have 1 minute to kill the ones that were already in the room before their reinforcements arrive or that you'll never have to fight the reinforcements because they foolishly tried to enter the room...

And then there are the fun combos when the other party members use their own abilities to force enemies into these concentration spells. While the wizard only casts one spell, a fighter with the shield master feat can attack and then shove a creature inside, essentially boosting the effectiveness of the spell while costing no additional resources. There are also a few spells that force enemy movement, which your 3 casters could use in combination to boost their overall damage while only using one spell each.

TL;DR


By using their resources in an efficient rather than effective manner, your player will achieve the same results while spending fewer resources. Blasting everything works, but is costly. Controlling the battlefield allows the party to fight fewer enemies at a time, reducing the strain on their spell load.