3 Removed real world examples.
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TL;DR: Deceiving party members and taking more than his fair share of loot is out of alignment for a good character, even if it is lawful for him to do so.

Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). Real world example: Ayn Rand. The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the exploitative (but law abiding) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character. Real world example: Edward Snowden.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust and doing so will lead to a better outcome for everyone.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.

Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). Real world example: Ayn Rand. The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the exploitative (but law abiding) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character. Real world example: Edward Snowden.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust and doing so will lead to a better outcome for everyone.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.

TL;DR: Deceiving party members and taking more than his fair share of loot is out of alignment for a good character, even if it is lawful for him to do so.

Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the exploitative (but law abiding) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust and doing so will lead to a better outcome for everyone.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.

2 added 120 characters in body
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Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). Real world example: Ayn Rand. The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the the exploitative (but legallaw abiding) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character. Real world example: Edward Snowden.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust and doing so will lead to a better outcome for everyone.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.

Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the the exploitative (but legal) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.

Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). Real world example: Ayn Rand. The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the exploitative (but law abiding) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character. Real world example: Edward Snowden.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust and doing so will lead to a better outcome for everyone.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.

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Goodness and Lawfulfulness are entirely seperate character traits, are therefore each is measured on its own axis: Good vs Evil, and Lawful vs Chaotic.

Being good does not necessarily incline a character to be lawful, and being lawful does not necessarily incline a character to be good. The same can be said for the opposite ends of the respective scales.

Some people have difficulty distinguishing between good and lawful for cultural socialisation reasons (in the real world we are taught to collapse this distinction), but nevertheless they are in fact unrelated.

Lawful Evil

For example, it is entirely possible to be lawful evil. This type of character believes in order and authority above all else. He doesn't act out of "evilness", but out of self interest and to enforce the prevailing social order. Fictional example: Darth Vader (bringing order to the galaxy through ruthless oppression). The Lawful evil character is a common trope in film and television, and encompasses characters from bureaucrats to despots who work within the system to benefit themselves at the expense of others, either intentionally or through disregard.

In the real world, the the exploitative (but legal) employer, the overzealous police officer, the soldier (essentially a mercenary for the state), the usurer (someone who lends you money knowing you will be trapped by the debt) or the member of an oppressive government (i.e. politician) are examples of lawful evil. They are highly immoral but obey the law and respect authority.

Chaotic Good

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the chaotic good character. This is the Robin Hood archetype who does good irrespective of the law. He doesn't necessarily set out to break the law, but he's perfectly willing to do so to achieve a good outcome. Han Solo is another chaotic good character.

In the real world, the revolutionary fighting for freedom or justice, and citizens who engage in civil disobedience to protest some injustice are examples of chaotic good. You would find this kind of person working for Sea Shepherd or Greenpeace, or joining a revolutionary organisation. They are driven by morality and are willing to break the law if they feel it is unjust.

The Druid

Application of good is somewhat subjective to the character's values, however good aligned characters are generally concerned with the wellbeing of others and society in general, and hold honesty and loyalty to other good characters as important values. They are highly moral, and sometimes criminal.

Greed often leads to evil, but is not necessarily evil in and of itself. It's how the characters acts on his greedy impulses. However, taking more that their fair share and deceiving their party mates, even if it is perfectly legal to do so, is incongruent with a good belief system, and more akin to lawful evil than chaotic good.