since we conclude pathfinder isn't "copying" exactly later, best not to call it that here.
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doppelgreener
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Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully.


This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. IfIf you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copiedre-used the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

Sure enough, Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha is part of the d20 System, a set of content published by the owner of D&D under a particular license for others to use. Pathfinder explicitly references this license as the source of their authority to use this content.

But if you're going to use the same license, be very careful to read exactly what is and is not covered. Many licenses allow you to use certain content, but only in certain ways. Many require you to license your derivative work according to the same rules as the original work.

Looking at what other people have done only gets you so far. In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully.


This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

Sure enough, Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha is part of the d20 System, a set of content published by the owner of D&D under a particular license for others to use. Pathfinder explicitly references this license as the source of their authority to use this content.

But if you're going to use the same license, be very careful to read exactly what is and is not covered. Many licenses allow you to use certain content, but only in certain ways. Many require you to license your derivative work according to the same rules as the original work.

Looking at what other people have done only gets you so far. In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully.


This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have re-used the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

Sure enough, Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha is part of the d20 System, a set of content published by the owner of D&D under a particular license for others to use. Pathfinder explicitly references this license as the source of their authority to use this content.

But if you're going to use the same license, be very careful to read exactly what is and is not covered. Many licenses allow you to use certain content, but only in certain ways. Many require you to license your derivative work according to the same rules as the original work.

Looking at what other people have done only gets you so far. In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

added 107 characters in body
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Joe
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Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully.


This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

InSure enough, Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha is part of the d20 System, a set of content published by the owner of D&D under a particular license for others to use. Pathfinder explicitly references this license as the source of their authority to use this content.

But if you're going to use the same license, be very careful to read exactly what is and is not covered. Many licenses allow you to use certain content, but only in certain ways. Many require you to license your derivative work according to the same rules as the original work.

Looking at what other people have done only gets you so far. In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully.


This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

Sure enough, Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha is part of the d20 System, a set of content published by the owner of D&D under a particular license for others to use. Pathfinder explicitly references this license as the source of their authority to use this content.

But if you're going to use the same license, be very careful to read exactly what is and is not covered. Many licenses allow you to use certain content, but only in certain ways. Many require you to license your derivative work according to the same rules as the original work.

Looking at what other people have done only gets you so far. In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

added 107 characters in body
Source Link
Joe
  • 16.7k
  • 6
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  • 126

This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This ismay be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It ismay be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D hasmay have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This is such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It is infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D has licensed the concept for use.

In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer.

If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their design, your work doesn't infringe on their copyright at all.

The problem comes when you copy some of their design. If your work is substantially similar to theirs, it's considered infringement. But how similar does it have to be? Courts have come up with many different answers on this, using many different tests.

Short of talking to a lawyer (which is generally a good idea when worrying about legal issues), it might be helpful to look at what other people have done. As you noted in your question, both Pathfinder and Dungeon World have copied the Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha concepts from D&D. This suggests three possibilities:

  1. This may be such a small thing to copy that it's not infringement.
  2. It may be infringement, but the copyright owner hasn't bothered to take action.
  3. The owner of D&D may have licensed the concept for use. (They have licensed some things.)

In the end, if you're not sure whether your work is legal, talk to a lawyer.

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Joe
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