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4 mentioned that the bard is also mortal
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In your case, the trigger being "the bard casting his spell" (presumably Faerie Fire), this can be as easy as counterspelling the spell on the turn it is cast using your own reaction, or simply downing the bard before he gets to cast his spell.

Additionally, the best condition you can apply to a creature in order to prevent it from taking reactions is dead (or, in case of PCs, unconscious), so downing the character that readied the action or the one that is about to be the trigger (the bard in your case) could also be a solution.

In your case, the trigger being "the bard casting his spell" (presumably Faerie Fire), this can be as easy as counterspelling the spell on the turn it is cast using your own reaction.

Additionally, the best condition you can apply to a creature in order to prevent it from taking reactions is dead (or, in case of PCs, unconscious), so downing the character that readied the action or the one that is about to be the trigger (the bard in your case) could also be a solution.

In your case, the trigger being "the bard casting his spell" (presumably Faerie Fire), this can be as easy as counterspelling the spell on the turn it is cast using your own reaction, or simply downing the bard before he gets to cast his spell.

Additionally, the best condition you can apply to a creature in order to prevent it from taking reactions is dead (or, in case of PCs, unconscious), so downing the character that readied the action could also be a solution.

3 added a short line
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Additionally, the best condition you can apply to a creature in order to prevent it from taking reactions is dead (or, in case of PCs, unconscious), so downing the character that readied the action or the one that is about to be the trigger (the bard in your case) could also be a solution.

Additionally, the best condition you can apply to a creature in order to prevent it from taking reactions is dead (or, in case of PCs, unconscious), so downing the character that readied the action could also be a solution.

Additionally, the best condition you can apply to a creature in order to prevent it from taking reactions is dead (or, in case of PCs, unconscious), so downing the character that readied the action or the one that is about to be the trigger (the bard in your case) could also be a solution.

2 added 29 characters in body
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This can be done either by forcing the character to burn his reaction either defensively (using a Shield spell, the ShiledShield master feat, the Sentinel feat, etc) or offensively (for an opportunity attack, battle master maneuver, etc). Additionally, there are some spells that explictly force the character to use its reaction or take it away (be it explicitly or through a condition which does not allow reactions): Dissonate whispers (forces the character to use its reaction to run away), Slow (the target can no longer use reactions), Tasha's hideous laughter (incapacitated), Hold person (paralyzed implies incapacitated), etc.

  • note that readied spells require concentration, so simply attacking the caster to attept to break it through a concentration check is enough

  • Counterspell it on the turn it is cast (using your own reaction)

  • Dispel it after it has been cast, but before it is triggered - this is because once the spell has been cast as normal, it is no longer an instantaneous spell in the process of being cast, but an ongoing magical effect that requires concentration. Yes, I know, this seems weird and should be house ruled at your table, but it's RAW according to the concentration rules (PHB p. 203) which state that spells that require concentration are not instantaneous - which is a requirement for Counterspell, and the official rules answers for March 2016:

Additionally, keep in my that according to this weird tweet delivering the word of God (to be read: Jeremy Crawford), Dispel magicDispel magic does not require you to see the target:

This can be done either by forcing the character to burn his reaction either defensively (using a Shield spell, the Shiled master feat, the Sentinel feat, etc) or offensively (for an opportunity attack, battle master maneuver, etc). Additionally, there are some spells that explictly force the character to use its reaction or take it away (be it explicitly or through a condition which does not allow reactions): Dissonate whispers (forces the character to use its reaction to run away), Slow (the target can no longer use reactions), Tasha's hideous laughter (incapacitated), Hold person (paralyzed implies incapacitated), etc.

  • note that readied spells require concentration, so simply attacking the caster to attept to break it through a concentration check is enough

  • Counterspell it on the turn it is cast (using your own reaction)

  • Dispel it after it has been cast, but before it is triggered - this is because once the spell has been cast as normal, it is no longer an instantaneous spell, but an ongoing magical effect that requires concentration. Yes, I know, this seems weird and should be house ruled at your table, but it's RAW according to the concentration rules (PHB p. 203) which state that spells that require concentration are not instantaneous - which is a requirement for Counterspell, and the official rules answers for March 2016:

Additionally, keep in my that according to this weird tweet delivering the word of God (to be read: Jeremy Crawford), Dispel magic does not require you to see the target:

This can be done either by forcing the character to burn his reaction either defensively (using a Shield spell, the Shield master feat, the Sentinel feat, etc) or offensively (for an opportunity attack, battle master maneuver, etc). Additionally, there are some spells that explictly force the character to use its reaction or take it away (be it explicitly or through a condition which does not allow reactions): Dissonate whispers (forces the character to use its reaction to run away), Slow (the target can no longer use reactions), Tasha's hideous laughter (incapacitated), Hold person (paralyzed implies incapacitated), etc.

  • note that readied spells require concentration, so simply attacking the caster to attept to break it through a concentration check is enough

  • Counterspell it on the turn it is cast (using your own reaction)

  • Dispel it after it has been cast, but before it is triggered - this is because once the spell has been cast as normal, it is no longer an instantaneous spell in the process of being cast, but an ongoing magical effect that requires concentration. Yes, I know, this seems weird and should be house ruled at your table, but it's RAW according to the concentration rules (PHB p. 203) which state that spells that require concentration are not instantaneous - which is a requirement for Counterspell, and the official rules answers for March 2016:

Additionally, keep in my that according to this weird tweet delivering the word of God (to be read: Jeremy Crawford), Dispel magic does not require you to see the target:

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