2 Gave it a heading.
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Inspiration is your friend.

In general, the answer is usually to talk to your players. However, if you want to work this through in-game behavior, you need to provide in-game incentives.

Fortunately, 5e has a built-in mechanic expressly for this problem. If someone role plays an interaction, give them Inspiration. It is expressly there as a reward for good role play. It is granted when you:

...play out your personality traits, give in to the drawbacks presented by a flaw or bond, and otherwise portray your character in a compelling way.

Do this often and generously for the players who are exhibiting this sort of behavior. Hopefully the others will get the hint. If not, make a point of saying exactly why you are awarding it.

If this doesn't work, explain to them why you are not enjoying the game as much as you could. The Dungeonmaster does a lot of work to make an enjoyable game for the others. They should be willing to pitch in and meet you half way.

In general, the answer is usually to talk to your players. However, if you want to work this through in-game behavior, you need to provide in-game incentives.

Fortunately, 5e has a built-in mechanic expressly for this problem. If someone role plays an interaction, give them Inspiration. It is expressly there as a reward for good role play. It is granted when you:

...play out your personality traits, give in to the drawbacks presented by a flaw or bond, and otherwise portray your character in a compelling way.

Do this often and generously for the players who are exhibiting this sort of behavior. Hopefully the others will get the hint. If not, make a point of saying exactly why you are awarding it.

If this doesn't work, explain to them why you are not enjoying the game as much as you could. The Dungeonmaster does a lot of work to make an enjoyable game for the others. They should be willing to pitch in and meet you half way.

Inspiration is your friend.

In general, the answer is usually to talk to your players. However, if you want to work this through in-game behavior, you need to provide in-game incentives.

Fortunately, 5e has a built-in mechanic expressly for this problem. If someone role plays an interaction, give them Inspiration. It is expressly there as a reward for good role play. It is granted when you:

...play out your personality traits, give in to the drawbacks presented by a flaw or bond, and otherwise portray your character in a compelling way.

Do this often and generously for the players who are exhibiting this sort of behavior. Hopefully the others will get the hint. If not, make a point of saying exactly why you are awarding it.

If this doesn't work, explain to them why you are not enjoying the game as much as you could. The Dungeonmaster does a lot of work to make an enjoyable game for the others. They should be willing to pitch in and meet you half way.

1
source | link

In general, the answer is usually to talk to your players. However, if you want to work this through in-game behavior, you need to provide in-game incentives.

Fortunately, 5e has a built-in mechanic expressly for this problem. If someone role plays an interaction, give them Inspiration. It is expressly there as a reward for good role play. It is granted when you:

...play out your personality traits, give in to the drawbacks presented by a flaw or bond, and otherwise portray your character in a compelling way.

Do this often and generously for the players who are exhibiting this sort of behavior. Hopefully the others will get the hint. If not, make a point of saying exactly why you are awarding it.

If this doesn't work, explain to them why you are not enjoying the game as much as you could. The Dungeonmaster does a lot of work to make an enjoyable game for the others. They should be willing to pitch in and meet you half way.