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The notion that different characters or pieces have different attributes seems to be one we take for granted today, but upon a quick historical survey, it is not so. After all, in chess, a pawn takes a queen or rook without any care for the latter's Constitution or Dexterity. Wargames such as Tactics used a combat results table rather than assign stats to individual units, which is something we even see in earlier editions of D&D (the weapons vs armours table).

Chainmail already had statistics such as armor class in '71 or '72, and obviously, the six attributes formed a key part of original Dungeons and Dragons in 1974.

Which RPG was the first to present stats as we know them today - a series of various attributes unique to an individual character? What proto-RPGs inspired this system to present stats as it did?

For the purposes of this question, any statistic assigned specifically to a unit will do - "swordsmen have 5 hit points" or "mounted archers deal 7 damage" or "hobbits can carry 20 pounds of loot." I would also be interested in non-numeric attributes (as someone mentioned in the comments) as long as they fit the concept of stats and not lookup tables or similar.

The notion that different characters or pieces have different attributes seems to be one we take for granted today, but upon a quick historical survey, it is not so. After all, in chess, a pawn takes a queen or rook without any care for the latter's Constitution or Dexterity. Wargames such as Tactics used a combat results table rather than assign stats to individual units, which is something we even see in earlier editions of D&D (the weapons vs armours table).

Chainmail already had statistics such as armor class in '71 or '72, and obviously, the six attributes formed a key part of original Dungeons and Dragons in 1974.

Which RPG was the first to present stats as we know them today - a series of various attributes unique to an individual character? What proto-RPGs inspired this system to present stats as it did?

For the purposes of this question, any statistic assigned specifically to a unit will do - "swordsmen have 5 hit points" or "mounted archers deal 7 damage" or "hobbits can carry 20 pounds of loot." I would also be interested in non-numeric attributes (as someone mentioned in the comments) as long as they fit the concept of stats and not lookup tables or similar.

The notion that different characters or pieces have different attributes seems to be one we take for granted today, but upon a quick historical survey, it is not so. After all, in chess, a pawn takes a queen or rook without any care for the latter's Constitution or Dexterity. Wargames such as Tactics used a combat results table rather than assign stats to individual units, which is something we even see in earlier editions of D&D (the weapons vs armours table).

Chainmail already had statistics such as armor class in '71 or '72, and obviously, the six attributes formed a key part of original Dungeons and Dragons in 1974.

Which RPG was the first to present stats as we know them today - a series of various attributes unique to an individual character? What inspired this system to present stats as it did?

For the purposes of this question, any statistic assigned specifically to a unit will do - "swordsmen have 5 hit points" or "mounted archers deal 7 damage" or "hobbits can carry 20 pounds of loot." I would also be interested in non-numeric attributes (as someone mentioned in the comments) as long as they fit the concept of stats and not lookup tables or similar.

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What RPG was the first to use stats, and what was it inspired by?

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The notion that different characters or pieces have different attributes seems to be one we take for granted today, but upon a quick historical survey, it is not so. After all, in chess, a pawn takes a queen or rook without any care for the latter's Constitution or Dexterity. Wargames such as Tactics used a combat results table rather than assign stats to individual units, which is something we even see in earlier editions of D&D (the weapons vs armours table).

Chainmail already had statistics such as armor class in '71 or '72, and obviously, the six attributes formed a key part of original Dungeons and DragonsDungeons and Dragons in 1974.

Which RPG was the first to present stats as we know them today - a series of various attributes unique to an individual character? What proto-RPGs inspired this system to present stats as it did?

For the purposes of this question, any statistic assigned specifically to a unit will do - "swordsmen have 5 hit points" or "mounted archers deal 7 damage" or "hobbits can carry 20 pounds of loot." I would also be interested in non-numeric attributes (as someone mentioned in the comments) as long as they fit the concept of stats and not lookup tables or similar.

The notion that different characters or pieces have different attributes seems to be one we take for granted today, but upon a quick historical survey, it is not so. After all, in chess, a pawn takes a queen or rook without any care for the latter's Constitution or Dexterity. Wargames such as Tactics used a combat results table rather than assign stats to individual units, which is something we even see in earlier editions of D&D (the weapons vs armours table).

Chainmail already had statistics such as armor class in '71 or '72, and obviously, the six attributes formed a key part of original Dungeons and Dragons in 1974.

Which RPG was the first to present stats as we know them today - a series of various attributes unique to an individual character? What proto-RPGs inspired this system to present stats as it did?

For the purposes of this question, any statistic assigned specifically to a unit will do - "swordsmen have 5 hit points" or "mounted archers deal 7 damage" or "hobbits can carry 20 pounds of loot." I would also be interested in non-numeric attributes (as someone mentioned in the comments) as long as they fit the concept of stats and not lookup tables or similar.

The notion that different characters or pieces have different attributes seems to be one we take for granted today, but upon a quick historical survey, it is not so. After all, in chess, a pawn takes a queen or rook without any care for the latter's Constitution or Dexterity. Wargames such as Tactics used a combat results table rather than assign stats to individual units, which is something we even see in earlier editions of D&D (the weapons vs armours table).

Chainmail already had statistics such as armor class in '71 or '72, and obviously, the six attributes formed a key part of original Dungeons and Dragons in 1974.

Which RPG was the first to present stats as we know them today - a series of various attributes unique to an individual character? What proto-RPGs inspired this system to present stats as it did?

For the purposes of this question, any statistic assigned specifically to a unit will do - "swordsmen have 5 hit points" or "mounted archers deal 7 damage" or "hobbits can carry 20 pounds of loot." I would also be interested in non-numeric attributes (as someone mentioned in the comments) as long as they fit the concept of stats and not lookup tables or similar.

    Post Reopened by KRyan, lisardggY, WrongOnTheInternet, SPavel, SevenSidedDie
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    Post Closed as "off-topic" by SevenSidedDie
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