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So I just made level 10 with my paladin and got the added feature "Aura of Courage." I understand that currently I and anyone within 10 ft of me will be immune to the frightened condition. My question then:
If one of my allies is currently frightened and runs into my Aura, do they lose their frightened condition automatically? Or would they just pass through and keep running around?

I'm interested in RAW and what other DMs have ruled here.

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Rules As Intended are that the Condition is Suspended

Jeremy Crawford answered this question about Aura of Devotion that has the same type of wording problem.

Aura of Courage:

[Y]ou and friendly creatures within 10 feet of you can’t be frightened while you are conscious.

Aura of Devotion:

[Y]ou and friendly creatures within 10 feet of you can't be charmed while you are conscious.

Jeremy's Ruling:

RAW is unclear. RAI is that [the condtition] is precluded/suspended while you're in the aura.

https://twitter.com/JeremyECrawford/status/722860204459630592

This ruling would strongly imply the RAI are that the conditions are suspended, but not removed by entering the aura.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Blast, there goes my high-speed paladin charm/fear clearing monorail idea. \$\endgroup\$ – Yakk May 18 '17 at 22:12
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The RAW, as others have mentioned, is vague. I would rule that a frightened ally would lose the frightened condition immediately within 10' of the Paladin (and, indeed when initially frightened, might specifically head for the Paladin as a safe-feeling haven) but the "clock" would still be ticking, and he would regain the frightened condition if separated from the Paladin by more than 10' before the phenomenon that caused the frightened condition ends.

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Aura of Courage

Starting at 10th level, you and friendly creatures within 10 feet of you can’t be frightened while you are conscious.

RAW on this one is vague and open to interpretation. Since it doesn't directly address the a scenario you are suggesting, I think it would be safe to apply the "can't be" to anyone within 10 feet. As in, "Am I still frightened? No, I can't be".

I could also see it as the "can't be" being interpreted as can't receive the frightened condition if you were within 10 feet when the effect began. If ruled this way, you may be asked by a DM to make a save (perhaps even immediately) with advantage against the condition you received outside of the 10 foot radius.

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According to the effect on page 85 of PHB: "they can't be frightened while you are conscious."

If you are conscious and they are within 10 feet of you, they cannot be affected by the frightened condition. If they are outside of that range, they can be. So it acts as a suppressor, not a dispeller. The condition is still active on the creature, but the creature does not suffer its effects. However, it would still get a saving throw against being frightened, where applicable.

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I disagree that RAW is vague; it seems quite clear. The feature says:

You and friendly creatures within 10 feet of you can’t be Frightened while you are conscious.

It doesn't say "can't be affected by the Frightened condition".

A condition is either on you or not. If you have a condition, and then encounter a state where you can't have that condition, then you don't have that condition anymore.

The easiest analogy is to look at a condition describing a physical state. If you're prone, and then the rules say you "can't be prone", then you're not prone. You won't fall prone just because the prohibition effect ends.

The exception is where you're under an effect that applies a condition regularly/continually. For example, if an enemy puts an effect on you that says "for the rest of the encounter, you're Frightened as long as you're holding a weapon" then that effect will continue, even while you can't be affected by its consequences.

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