1
\$\begingroup\$

How many spells can an Oracle use per day and learn at level 30 in Pathfinder?

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

According to the vanilla rules, there is no such thing as a level 30 Oracle.

Pathfinder is supposed to handle PCs with levels between 1 and 20 and does that more-or-less well. The 20th level is supposed to already be the capstone of the possibilities of a class.

If you want to run over-the-top games with characters even more powerful, you can use mythic rules (it doesn't function like additional levels but gives you up to 10 "mythic ranks"). A spellcaster doesn't automatically gain new spell slots/spell known with more mythic ranks, but he can choose mythic features for that.

But there are optional rules you seem to be using.

You can also follow the previous recommendations (optional rules that existed before the mythic rules, for some reason they can be found in the favored class section). That said, either:

  • You can't have more than 20 levels in the same class, but you can multi-class past this 20th level. By following this rule, your 30th level Oracle still can't exist.

  • You can put more that 20 levels in the same class. In that case at each level you gain a certain number of spells known or of spell slots, depending on your choice:

A spellcaster’s caster level continues to increase by one for each level beyond 20th level. Every odd-numbered level, a spellcaster gains access to a new level of spell one above his previous maximum level, gaining one spell slot in that new level. These spell slots can be used to prepare or cast spells adjusted by metamagic feats or any known spell of lower levels. Every even-numbered level, a spellcaster gains additional spell slots equal to the highest level spell he can currently cast. He can split these new slots any way he wants among the slots he currently has access to. [...]

Spellcasters who have a limited number of spells known (such as bards and sorcerers) can opt out of the benefits they gain (either a new level of spells or a number of spell slots) for that level and in exchange learn two more spells of any level they can currently cast.

That means if you never opt for the "bonus spell known" option, your level 30 Oracle:

  • will get one spell slot for each level up to 14th.

  • will get 60 "slot points" (assuming a nth level slot takes 1 "slot point"). For example he can have 60 more slots for 1st level spells, or one more slot for levels 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14)

  • won't know more spell than he knew at his 20th level

Alternatively he can use the "new spell learn option", up to 10 times (once per level), to learn 2 more spells, so a maximum of 20 more spell known.

It seems to me the "best choice" is probably to keep the additional spell slot when it unlocks you a new spell level, and forgo it for new spell known only when it doesn't. In that case you will end up with 9/5/5/4/4/4/3/3/3/3 spell known (+10 at the levels he wants) and infinite/6/6/6/6/6/6/6/6/6/1/1/1/1/1 spell slots (+ the bonus ones from your Charisma)

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ShadowKras: "Every even-numbered level, a spellcaster gains additional spell slots equal to the highest level spell he can currently cast. He can split these new slots any way he wants among the slots he currently has access to" -> basically at lvl 22 when you are able to cast 10th level spells you can gain 10 new slots for 1st level spells or 5 for 2nd level ones. This is detailed unambiguously in the part I skipped for concision but you can follow the link if you are not convinced. When you reach level 30 if you sum up all the slot you gained it makes 60. \$\endgroup\$ – Anne Aunyme May 23 '17 at 11:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Edited to change some of the numbers, I made a mistake calculating everything but it should be fixed. \$\endgroup\$ – Anne Aunyme May 23 '17 at 11:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah, 60 was my calculation aswell. I was about to post a second (third?) answer to fix that. \$\endgroup\$ – ShadowKras May 23 '17 at 11:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.