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I'm considering playing an Unearthed Arcana stone sorcerer.

After I hit with an attack and choose to use a smite spell, can I then use twin spell to double cast that smite spell?

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    \$\begingroup\$ It's also worth pointing out, you can't hit with an attack and then cast a smite spell - you need to cast the smite spell before you attack. \$\endgroup\$ – Miniman Jul 17 '17 at 23:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can I ask where that is stated? I have been reading the descriptions of the spells and divine smite and I cannot find wording as such. I may be missing something in the wording. \$\endgroup\$ – Matthew Perryman Jul 18 '17 at 20:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MatthewPerryman Divine Smite is not a spell and the thing Miniman said doesn't apply to it. However, the "smite" spells are concentration spells that specify that the extra damage (and potential other effect) occurs "the next time you hit with a [melee] weapon attack during this spell’s duration". They're not reaction spells that are cast after you hit; they're concentration spells with a casting time of 1 bonus action. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast May 25 '18 at 5:53
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No. Twinned Spell only works on

a spell that targets only one creature and doesn't have a range of self.

All the smite spells have Range: Self, so none of them can be used with Twinned Spell.

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No, because smite spells have a range of "self".

If you look through the list of smite spells that you get, they all have a range of "self". The text of twinned spell (PHB 102) explicitly prohibits spells with a range of self (emphasis added):

When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip).

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