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I have asked a question about comparing the Page of Spell Knowledge and the Ring of Spell Knowledge in Pathfinder. However, after asking it I realized that I am a bit confused about how does it work. Does it...

  • ...add the spell to the list of your known spells, not counting towards your maximum amount of spells known?
  • ...just allow you to look at the page and cast a spell from it as many times as you can, powering it using your spell slots?

If the first point is correct, does it...

  • ...disappear upon usage?
  • ...allow for multiple spontaneous casters to benefit from it?
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The item has this effect:

It contains the knowledge of a single arcane or divine spell (chosen by the creator when the item is crafted).

If the bearer is a spontaneous spellcaster and has that spell on her class spell list, she may use her spell slots to cast that spell as if it were one of her spells known.

So when this item is generated, a spell must be selected. Should be one spontaneous spellcasters can use or it wouldn't make much sense.

See the text I bolded above. Two conditions must be met for the item to be useable.

  • bearer is a spontaneous spellcaster
  • has that spell on her class spell list

Addressing your points:

  • ...add the spell to the list of your known spells, not counting towards your maximum amount of spells known?

Yes-ish. But only so long as you are the "bearer" of the page. The interpretation below is better.

  • ...just allow you to look at the page and cast a spell from it as many times as you can, powering it using your spell slots?

Yes.

If the first point is correct, does it...

  • ...disappear upon usage?

Nope.

  • ...allow for multiple spontaneous casters to benefit from it?

Yes. If they pass the page along, they can cast the spell using their slots.

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There is no clear ruling on how the item works. By examining the item we see that it is a wondrous item. So by examining other wondrous items we can have a better understanding of how this one works.

Now wondrous items tend to be body slot items, and a page of spell knowledge does not fit here, so lets move on to the slotless items which it should have more in common with.

By seeing what is on the list we see that there are both consumable and permanent effect items on the list. By reading some of the items Ive come to the conclusion that you must use common sense as its not clear. Lets take a fairly obvious example of universal solvent. Which must be consumed but doesnt actually state it...

This substance has the unique property of being able to dissolve sovereign glue, tanglefoot bags, and all other adhesives. Applying the solvent is a standard action.

So in the end, there is no solid answer as to how the item is suppose to function. However by reading the text of spell knowledge, I do not feel that it should be a consumable based on this line

If the bearer is a spontaneous spellcaster and has that spell on her class spell list, she may use her spell slots to cast that spell as if it were one of her spells known.

Since its clearly suppose to be carried with that word then it should not be consumed. So multiple casters could share this item. However it also leaves it open to being stolen.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The answer probably solves the problem of consumability, but not the problem of the spell being permanently added to the list of known spells or only allowed to be cast when possessing the Page of Spell Knowledge. \$\endgroup\$ – Baskakov_Dmitriy Aug 6 '17 at 23:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Baskakov_Dmitriy By having a bearer means its carried, so its just something you need to be carrying. So it does not go into your memory because you could lose the item and be unable to cast the spell \$\endgroup\$ – Fering Aug 6 '17 at 23:17

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