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When you fail the reflex save you gain the entangled condition, and then are subjected to the fort save whenever you are entangled by the spell. The spell specifically says that it is a poison condition which to me sounds like the poison rules should apply, and when you fail multiple saves the dc and duration should be increased.

The spell level is 2, and lets say my ability score is 18 (+4 mod), so the initial DC will be 10+4+2=16 providing I do not have anything else going on.

After they have failed the first save, due to poison rules the save DC should now be 18, and it will increase the duration from 1d4 to 1d4*1.5 or 1d4+1d2 rounds.

But this is only if the spell benefits from multiple doses of poison rules. So does the spell get to benefit?

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What would be the benefits of stacking?

As far as I can tell, the spell effect's duration is: As long as they remain in the area plus 1d4 rounds. This poison has no listed duration really, so it would last for a single round even over multiple doses unless they leave the spell area, which then would cause the poison's effect to last for 1d4 rounds. But both durations are part of the spell effect, not part of the poison's effect. All this poison does is to cause the sickened condition.

The description leads me to believe that mentioning that it is a poison effect only matters for things like a Dwarf's poison resistance, similar to Stinking Cloud or the Poison spell. If the purpose was for the spell to apply a specific poison effect on targets, it would have a poison entry, like Sweat Poison:

Glands along your neck, back, or wrists swell and exude a viscous injury poison (save Fort DC 14; frequency 1/round for 4 rounds; effect 1d2 Str; cure 1 save).

or Poisoned Egg:

You transform the contents of a normal egg into a single dose of small centipede poison (injury; save DC 11; frequency 1/round for 4 rounds; effect 1 Dex; cure 1 save).

Both of those spells, as they have a proper poison entry, would stack to increase the DC and the duration of the effect.

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