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How does shooting multiple bullets work? Do you roll to see if each bullet hits? Would you also roll each bullets damage seperatlly? Thanks in advance

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You normally roll once for each attack, but an attack can have more than one bullet.

P. 178 in the core rulebook(English version, first print) details the different firing modes and there is a table on p. 180. The weapon tables in the equipment section list what kind of firing modes each weapon has.

Firing your weapon in burst mode deals the same amount of damage as a single bullet attack, but use more bullets, give more recoil and gives the defender a penalty to their defense pool.

Firing on fully automatic is similar. You roll one attack and the defender takes a penalty to his defense pool. If you use a complex action to attack, the defenders penalty is -9 and you spend 10 bullets or if you use a simple action the penalty is -5 and you spend 6 bullets.

You can attack with one weapon in each hand by splitting the die pool evenly. In this case you roll once for each weapon even though you use one attack action.(And the multiple attack free action)

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Just a little backstory: Back in 4th edition, you had the option of narrow bursts or wide bursts when firing semi-auto or full-auto. Narrow bursts would increase the damage, while wide bursts would reduce the target's defense. 5e simplified this and narrow bursts are gone on the core rulebook. \$\endgroup\$ – ShadowKras Sep 25 '17 at 12:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, I didn't ask this sooner, but what about fully automatic? Does it have the same effect? \$\endgroup\$ – Bigbo Biggins Sep 27 '17 at 21:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BigboBiggins Yes. I edited the answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Ling Sep 28 '17 at 7:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Isn't it 6 bullets for the -5? \$\endgroup\$ – Patta Sep 28 '17 at 7:31

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