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I am fairly new to being a DM. I recently wrapped up Kingmaker: The Stolen Lands, for Pathfinder, with my group, one new player and a veteran. The veteran is playing a tribal native ranger from the surrounding lands. Upon completion of The Stolen Lands, he decides that his character hates the newcomers and wants nothing to do with the nation building, which is a major part of the campaign. I tried to have a couple of NPCs show that not all the settlers are weak, murderous, blights upon the land (his words), but he states that this is not enough.

Should I end it?

If not, what should I do?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Possible duplicate of What is "my guy syndrome" and how do I handle it? \$\endgroup\$
    – Quentin
    Oct 27 '17 at 8:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! If you have time, taking the tour should help with getting some familiarity with what we do here! \$\endgroup\$ Oct 27 '17 at 8:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ From what you've said, it seems like this veteran character is either not enjoying the Kingmaker campaign, or is trying to build up some in-game relations with NPCs to give a little more of a personal story. Could you expand a little on what steps you've taken to address the character's newfound hatred? (And possibly also touch on what actions the newcomers have taken that led to this hatred?) \$\endgroup\$ Oct 27 '17 at 8:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ I posted a comment here asking for precisions on this question, can I know why it disappeared? (and/or get the answers) \$\endgroup\$ Oct 27 '17 at 12:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ @AnneAunyme You left a request to reformulate a sentence that seemed to make sense, and I wanted to avoid what looked like the start of a help pile. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 27 '17 at 13:18
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Ask your players

If the players still want to play this campaign (as in "the path intended by the creators of the campaign"), either:

  • have the tribal native Ranger change his mind; (you should work with its player on what would satisfies him)
  • have the tribal native Ranger becoming an NPC and have its player roll a new character, more inclined to help the new comers. (e.g. the Ranger could join a guerilla group against the new comers, and the PCs might have to fight him.)

If they don't want to continue this exact campaign, you can:

  • have the other player(s) change their minds too and work with the ranger against the new comers, i.e. keep the setting but follow your own path from here. It will require some work.
  • choose together an other published adventure (you might have to reroll the PCs).
  • (other radicals solutions like creating a new different campaign, changing game, changing GM...)
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There are two possible explanations for this behavior:

  • It's a case of my guy syndrome where the player does what their character would do even though it stands in the way of a good story. See the linked questions for suggestions how to handle this.
  • The player wants to give you a subtle in-character hint that this is not the kind of campaign they are looking for and that they would rather like it to take a different direction. In that case you need to figure out how the other players think about this. Have an out-of-character discussion about the future direction of the campaign and come to a consensus. Possible conclusions could be:
    • The nation-building sounds interesting, let's go in that direction.
    • The nation-building sounds boring, let's leave the settlers alone and find some dungeon to raid.
    • We are bored with this whole setting, let's roll new characters and start something completely different.
    • We are bored with this whole game, let's play Monopoly.
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