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As there is no rule that I can find stating an ooze does not take falling damage I assume that they do. However, I did note that an ooze is amorphous, has no bones or internal organs, and should be able to reform/ morph itself when it hits the ground so to speak.

This may be me reading too much into the "amorphous" description and I think it likely that an ooze would still take falling damage as normal.

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According to the official rules, oozes do indeed take falling damage based simply on the fact that nothing states that they do not.

Based on a more realistic approach, they should still take falling damage. Take a real life pudding of your choice and drop it from a building. It has no bones or organs, and behaves in most ways as an unconscious ooze. Still, this experiment would leave it permanently ruined.

You say that an ooze, being amorphous, could put itself back together. While this logic seems sound at first, one should ask oneself: If this were true, how could I ever kill an Ooze? If it can reform after falling damage, why not after damage received fron an adventurer's weapons or spells?

My conclusion is that any part removed from the Ooze's main bulk "dies", and if an ooze gets too small, it can no longer sustain itself. (Except when it can split, like a Black Pudding — though falling damage is not slashing or piercing.) Again, dropping it from a high enough altitude would cause it to lose a great amount of itself upon impact.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ falling damage is clearly "blunt trauma" just like being hit with a baseball bat of very large diameter. \$\endgroup\$ – Trish Nov 17 '17 at 15:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Correct. Though, if you were to do that to a pudding, would it not still get damaged? \$\endgroup\$ – Arthaban Nov 17 '17 at 18:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ Cool, and we don't even need a splat book to arrive at this ruling. (Sorry, some puns just can't be avoided ...) \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 18 '17 at 3:17

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