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Psionic power Telekinetic Sphere has a save:

Saving Throw: Reflex negates (object)

All good. But the sphere can be targeted at a creature or an object, and picks up everything in its radius (at least a 15-foot sphere).

  • If the sphere is targeted on a creature, and that creature saves, is the whole power negated?

    • If the power is not entirely negated, is that creature moved outside the area of effect?
  • If the power is targeted on an unattended mundane object (that has no save) and there are some creatures in the area, what happen to them if they save? Do they even have a save?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Because the power telekinetic sphere is based on the spell resilient sphere, I think this may be a duplicate of this question. I mean, the answers won't differ because it's a psionic power unless you can add a reason to the question why you think they will. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Nov 19 '17 at 9:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ @heyicanchan different systems, the other one cannot target an object. Therefore not a dupe for several reasons. \$\endgroup\$ – Mindwin Jan 9 '18 at 16:52
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One creature's save doesn't negate the sphere. The sphere is an area effect centered on a creature or object, but that creature is not the target. Every creature within the area gets a save, like with a fireball. Every item in the area also gets a save, unless it's nonmagical and unattended.

You could therefore aim the spell at a mundane object next to a creature, but it wouldn't have any benefit, since the creature still gets a save.

No rule says that a Reflex save lets you leave the area of effect. However, since Reflex means a physical dodge, and "negates" means that you avoid the spell effect entirely on a successful save, that's the only logical explanation. (The alternative would be that the saving throw on a resilient sphere does nothing, which doesn't seem as intended.)

Explaining a sphere dodge in-world is an exercise for the DM, but by the time this spell comes into play, 15th-level characters and their opponents have a lot of abilities at their disposal. Perhaps the intended target jumps, causing the sphere to begin forming centered on him with its base one foot off the ground, whereupon he falls prone and lands safely beneath the sphere in the same square where he started.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! Take the tour. As per this question, the sphere spells are wacky, nonstandard spells with some language dating back now over 30 years, with Pathfinder, too, leaving it largely untouched. I think one of the concerns this answer could also address would be whether or not the sphere effect remains where it was centered even upon successful saving throws by all affected (creating an ersatz ball of force battlefield control effect). Anyway, thank you for taking the time to help strangers with this, and enjoy your stay. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Dec 10 '17 at 4:50
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What happens when they succeed in the save? Saving throws are reactions and bodily functions of the player. A fireball still explodes even if a rogue evades it entirely, a blade barrier still exists as a wall of blades even if a fighter passes the reflex save for dodging it being placed on top of him. In this case, in the effect description of telekinetic sphere, it states "Effect: 1-ft.-diameter/level sphere, centered around creatures or objects" which indicates that upon casting of this spell, that is the point of origin, whereas the objects and creatures have a chance to escape (moving adjacent to the sphere) before the sphere fully materializes, but the sphere will exist regardless, allowing you to have a movable indestructible force field.

Who gets to save? Again, the effect is "Effect: 1-ft.-diameter/level sphere, centered around creatures or objects" Any creatures or objects in this sphere get the save or be in an unbreakable forcefield for 1 minute/level

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