6
\$\begingroup\$

The Fire Giant Dreadnought, on VGtM 147, has a "Shield Charge" action, which states in part,

...if the attack hits, the target must also succeed on a DC 21 Strength saving throw or be pushed ahead of the giant for the rest of this move.

What exactly does this mean? Does the pushed creature end up in front of the square where the dreadnought finishes its charge? If multiple creatures are pushed, do they end up piled in the same square?

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

Does the pushed creature end up in front of the square where the dreadnought finishes its charge?

In front of the squares, given that the Giant is Huge and takes up 3x3 squares, but otherwise yes. Effectively, every time the Giant moves forward, the creature is pushed 1 square to a new square in front of it.

If multiple creatures are pushed, do they end up piled in the same square?

They probably shouldn't be; there's room for 3 Medium creatures in general in front of the Giant and since creatures shouldn't share spaces, dividing the targets over those is probably easier. In the unlikely event that the Giant shoves more than 3, probably some would be in the same square.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ To answer the unspoken next question, there aren't really any specific rules for occupying the same space with another creature, but since you're trying to fit in an area smaller than your combat space, an application of the Squeezing rules would be appropriate (i.e., double movement cost to get out of the square, disadvantage on attacks and dex saves, and attacks against you have advantage until you get out of it). \$\endgroup\$ – Darth Pseudonym Nov 20 '17 at 22:00
1
\$\begingroup\$

Each time the dreadnought moves forward it pushes the victim(s) forward. Because this is involuntary movement, there is no restriction on how many creatures end up in the same space (be they pushed creatures or creatures that just happen to be standing where the pushed creature(s) end up). The dreadnought cannot voluntarily end its move in an occupied space however.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.