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We just started playing D&D we are huge noobs and have problems with the wizard. I'm a level 2 Wizard with 3 level 1 Spellslots. Now the rulebook says:

You prepare the list of wizard spells that are available for you to cast. To do so, choose a number of wizard spells from your spellbook equal to your Intelligence modifier + your wizard level (minimum of one spell).

Does that mean I can prepare for example Magic Missile 5 times? So I can cast it 5 times before the next rest? Or can I only cast it 3 times because I have only 3 level 1 spell slots??

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marked as duplicate by mattdm, KRyan spells Dec 17 '17 at 2:46

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What is your intelligence score? \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Dec 16 '17 at 20:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ closely related, if not duplicate: rpg.stackexchange.com/q/44736/23970 \$\endgroup\$ – nitsua60 Dec 16 '17 at 20:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Rubiksmoose 16 \$\endgroup\$ – Xxy Dec 16 '17 at 20:45
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This means that you choose 5 distinct spells from your spellbook to have "prepared"--those that you've got ready to cast that day. Each prepared spell you can cast if you have a spell slot available.

Think of the prepared spells as spells you have available that day, and the spell slots as "charges" that are used to cast them. If you prepare magic missile along with alarm, burning hands, charm person, and chromatic orb, then those are the L1 spells available to you that day. You have 3 "charges"--slots--to use to cast any of those spells. You could cast magic missile three separate times and no other spells, or magic missile once and alarm twice, or any other combination of up to three castings.

This is described both in the class description and a little more broadly on PHB p.201, "Spell Slots." It's a quirky bit of how D&D's magic works, called "Vancian casting," that takes a bit of getting used to.

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