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Using the creature to object feature of true polymorph you can transform a creature into an object.

  • Can you then use that object as a consumable component for a spell?
  • How does the potential consumption of the component interact with the following part of true polymorph?

    The transformation lasts for the duration, or until the target drops to 0 hit points or dies.

  • If the spell is cast (and component consumed) successfully, what becomes of the polymorphed creature?

  • Does any of this change if the spell is made permanent before attempting to cast?

Assume that the object/spell component is one that true polymorph can actually create.

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Yes, you can.

True Polymorph only states that:

The transformation lasts for the duration, or until the target drops to 0 hit points or dies.

The steps in practice are:

  1. Convert Creature into Object
  2. Use object as consummable material components
  3. Consumption of material effectively reduces object to 0HP(my logic, no official ruling but a destroyed object logically needs to reach 0hp)
  4. Spell completes and object reverts to it's original creature form.

You now have both a completed spell and the original creature.

When should the creature revert?

The key aspect here is that the creature doesn't revert until it reaches 0HP, which is after the component is consumed. If it was before, then the component wouldn't have been consumed, the spell wouldn't have been successful, and the creature therefore would still be an active object.

Will it blend? Specific beats general.

The question of what consumed means is a sticking point. If the consumed material is absolutely destroyed, what does that mean and does it actually matter?

We know that consuming the component destroys it, but does that mean it's destruction preempts the specifics of true polymorph. In this case, the specifics of true polymorph would override the general consumption of components.

Permanency resolves conflict

If made permanent, then you're just dealing with a material component full stop. Use as needed.

9th level spell slot to create a component

Those who have access to 9th level spells likely have access to hard to find or expensive components. Utilizing this resource seems reasonable.

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Consumption of material effectively reduces object to 0HP". This seems like a leap of logic that isn't supported. Is there a rule that states consuming an object for a spell is "reducing it to 0 HP"? \$\endgroup\$
    – Baron
    Jan 9, 2018 at 19:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Baron This was a concern of mine as well. But while there isn't a rule for destroying an object is the same as 0HP, but it seems fairly logical that it is. \$\endgroup\$
    – NautArch
    Jan 9, 2018 at 20:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Baron: Yeah I also had this concern. It kind of bothers me that the component is not literally "consumed" since the component just changes back to a creature. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 9, 2018 at 20:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please make sure to indicate that your "Consumption of material effectively reduces object to 0HP" is your ruling. (Which it is). Consuming food transforms/transmutes a material in a mundane versus a magical way, for example, via digestion. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 9, 2018 at 22:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think it improves the answer to give the more detailed reasoning ... thanks. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 10, 2018 at 2:49
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Yes, you can

The polymorphed creature is an object and if it is the right object it can be used as a spell component.

Sadly for the polymophed creature, being consumed causes it to be forever lost. “Consumed” is not one of the conditions that causes the creature to revert and, when the spell ends, the object is no longer in existence so it cannot revert to the creature.

I would rule that a Wish could recover the creature but then, I’m a soft touch. I’m open minded about whether the creature is dead - if so, True Resurrection would also work - or simply gone.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I like the idea that consumed components go to form part of the weave, repairing it from general use etc. Now your BBEG is made of pure magic, and you are in real trouble \$\endgroup\$
    – SeriousBri
    Sep 17 at 8:17

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