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Some creatures, like Black Puddings, can damage weapons, armor and other equipement made of certain specific materials (for a Black Pudding, its wood and metal).

Most weapons have an easily identifiable material. But for nets and whips, I'm not so sure.

Is there guidance on this (in the DMG, perhaps) ?

The question could be narrowed to "Are nets and whips affected by a Black Pudding's wood/metal corrosion", but I think it's better to target a broader subject in this case.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Just a note, but is is actually usually better to ask a question about a specific issue rather than a general one. You get better answers on the SE with a specific question. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 12, 2018 at 19:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ I actually think the question is fine as is, I just wanted to let you know as an FYI since you mentioned it in your post. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 12, 2018 at 19:16

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Whips are generally made from braiding leather.

Nets are made by laying rope, line, or string in a lattice and knotting the intersections. Nets could be made from any material used to make rope (ie hemp).

thus both would be unaffected by black pudding.

Note: a net will not hold black pudding as it would pass through the holes. And it is immune to slashing damage; thus, a whip is likely to be ineffective unless there is a magic damage bonus.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Are you sure about black puddings passing through the holes of a net ? I know they have the ability to pass through things as little as 1 inch deep when they can move, but they aren't immune to the restrained condition. That might deserve its own question... \$\endgroup\$
    – Gael L
    Feb 12, 2018 at 19:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also note, the black pudding would be immune to damage from the whip, since it is immune to slashing damage. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 12, 2018 at 19:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ahhh, but you know, if you wanna split it... \$\endgroup\$
    – Gael L
    Feb 12, 2018 at 19:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GaelL -- yes worthy of another question. I guess black pudding could be considered to be restrained as it sieves through the net. \$\endgroup\$
    – ravery
    Feb 12, 2018 at 19:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ Note: nets have no effect on creatures that are "formless", so I suspect that this will stop the issue from coming up. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 12, 2018 at 20:04
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I don't believe D&D specifically defines the material.

Historically, a number of materials were used, though these are often wood fibers or natural fibers. At least some historical materials would have been subject to the pudding's effects.

In ancient Egypt, "Woven nets, weir baskets made from willow branches, harpoons and hook and line (the hooks having a length of between eight millimetres and eighteen centimetres) were all being used. By the 12th dynasty, metal hooks with barbs were being used. As is fairly common today, the fish were clubbed to death after capture." 1

Ancient Greece used "The fishers set up very light nets of buoyant flax and wheel in a circle round about while they violently strike the surface of the sea with their oars and make a din with sweeping blow of poles. At the flashing of the swift oars and the noise the fish bound in terror and rush into the bosom of the net which stands at rest, thinking it to be a shelter: foolish fishes which, frightened by a noise, enter the gates of doom. Then the fishers on either side hasten with the ropes to draw the net ashore." 2

Gillnets existed in ancient times as archaeological evidence from the Middle East demonstrates. In North America, aboriginal fishermen used cedar canoes and natural fibre nets, e.g., made with nettels or the inner bark of cedar.

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